Bachelor of Applied Science in Addictions and Integrated Treatment Services

Institution: 
Clark State Community College
Approval Status: 
Pending Comments
Comment Period: 
Tue, 08/07/2018 - 12:15pm to Tue, 08/21/2018 - 12:15pm

Comments

Comment: 
It is exciting to think of having a program available that will address the needs of the treatment community.

Comment: 
Clark State obtaining the Bachelor's of Applied Science in Addictions and Integrated Tx Services would be a huge benefit for not just the Springfield community but to all the surrounding counties. As Director of Champaign Co. Family and Children First, we are seeing more and more of our children in kinship care and out of home placements due to parent's addictions. I personally don't think the drug epidemic is going to get any better, until we establish these types of programs to properly educate and train more people in this field. Missy Ussher- Director of Champaign Co. Family and Children First

Comment: 
Disturbingly high levels of illicit drug use remain a problem among within the Springfield, Clark County, Ohio area. Our community is need of additional educational opportunities for individuals to become involved to address this issue. Clark State expanding their programming provides the community to have the opportunity to work with parents, health care professionals, and community officials to use programs with proven effectiveness, to identify students and work with them to gain the skills and knowledge to work within our community to serve at risk students and adults to make appropriate referrals. This is a win-win for the community.

Comment: 
Community colleges were intended to aid students in their technical and initial academic work, and if community colleges receive BA/BS program approval they will switch to focusing on BA & not AA/technical training, thereby ignoring their mandate and original purpose. Then – who will serve those students? In addition, providing additional competition in Ohio in the BA/BS lane endangers both state and private institutions during a period in which both high school and adult program populations are in decline and possibly wastes community college resources should these programs flounder; resources that should be better used to help students in their current community college programs.

Comment: 
There is a statewide shortage of licensed chemical dependency counselors. It is only expected to worsen as many Baby Boomers retire in the next 3-7 years. This Bachelor's program will fill a much needed "gap" in workforce development for the addiction agencies serving the Miami Valley and Central region. I strongly support the approval of this new degree program at Clark State.

Comment: 
Please add to my previous comments. My statements are based on my experience as both a clinician, manager, and administrator in the addictions profession and the larger behavioral health field for the last 25 years. I am currently employed at Montgomery County Alcohol, Drug Addiction, and Mental Health Services board as the Director of Treatment & Supportive Services.

Comment: 
One of our biggest concerns for the immediate and next 5-10 years in providing behavioral health services in Logan and Champaign Counties is the availability of a workforce capacity to meet the needs. As the Mental Health Drug & Alcohol Services Board for the two communities it is our job to plan, build capacity, address needs and fund services and supports for those needing mental health and addiction services. We are most definitely excited and supportive of a college willing to do what they can to address the workforce shortages by offering new programs that will provide the training and experience for new students and those people desiring to further their education to be prepared for a career dedicated to helping those struggling in addiction. Thank you for moving forward with the program.

Comment: 
This is such a great opportunity for the community of Springfield and the addictions field in general. As an employee of a drug treatment facility, I am aware of the shortage of candidates to fill the many needed positions. I am hopeful, knowing that opportunities are coming available to allow for more students to major in the field of addictions.

Comment: 
As an industry thought leader, we explore new horizons in health care, employee benefits, engagement, and wellness, pioneering the latest innovations and business models. With 70% of employers indicating that the opioid crisis affects their workplace, HORAN believes Clark State Community College’s Addiction and Integrated Treatment program, which will prepare students to contribute to this field of treatment upon graduation, will make a significant impact in providing the support that individuals, families and employers need in navigating addiction.

Comment: 
MonDay Community Based Correctional Facility supports Clark State’s proposed application to establish a Bachelor of Applied Science in Addictions and Integrated Treatment Services Program. This program is needed to provide specific training for potential employees to work with the criminal justice population in treating their substance abuse and mental health disorders. It is a very marketable one that fits the needs of employers in southwestern Ohio. MonDay is committed to working with CSCC to ensure that the program is implemented and sustainable. We are willing to provide internships for students and would consider graduates of the program for employment. I hope the Ohio Department of Higher Education will give CSCC application serious consideration as this program will fulfill the professional occupational need for many organizations and agencies that work with those struggling with substance abuse and mental health disorders. Thank you, Mike Flannery, Director, MonDay CBCF

Comment: 
On behalf of the Mental Health & Recovery Board of Clark, Greene and Madison Counties, I fully support Clark State's application. Their integrated approach to address addiction and mental health is unique and meets a current gap in the workforce. Additionally, Clark State's inclusion of governmental, workforce development, business, and non-profit community entities in the planning and implementation of this program sets the stage for it's success in Springfield/Clark County and surrounding areas. Students will gain practical, employable skills and by growing the workforce, will effectively serve more people with addiction and mental health problems.

Comment: 
The Substance Abuse Counseling Program at the University of Cincinnati has reviewed the Bachelor of Applied Science, Addiction and Integrated Treatment proposed by Clark State. The authors of the proposal have laid out a strong case for workforce development in the area of chemical dependency counseling and correctly noted, in our view, that this could indirectly reduce the costs imposed by substance use disorders in Ohio. We are not sure, however, that another program is needed. First, one of the key arguments for the proposed program is that the commute from the Springfield area to existing programs is cost-prohibitive. The proposal neglects to mention that the Substance Abuse Counseling (SACN) Program at University of Cincinnati (UC) is fully online and therefore students do not have to travel to Cincinnati. Students do their internship experiences in their local communities and could start helping to address problems associated with substance use disorder in Springfield during this experience. Second, we find that the authors have also likely oversold the need for another program by failing to mention anywhere that students can earn a bachelor’s degree in any behavioral science (e.g., social work, psychology, nursing), complete a certificate program in chemical dependency counseling (ours is two semesters in length), and earn the LCDCIII with the addition of work experience and a passing score on the ADC exam. There are multiple pathways to the bachelor's level license and that should be acknowledged. Finally, we are also concerned that the proposed program includes an internship may not be feasible, would be training students to practice outside their scope (by treating other mental disorders), and would not likely meet the standards for becoming accredited by NASAC in its current form. Overall, we do not object to the approval of another program, but we have some questions and concerns about the current proposal.

Comment: 
TCN, as a provider of dual services, is very excited to offer our support for the Bachelor of Applied Science in Addictions and Integrated Treatment Services Program. As a community mental health and substance abuse treatment provider agency, we recognize the immense value that such a program will offer to our clients as well as the students themselves. Further, as a partner agency with Clark State Community College, this program will expand the learning potential of the practicum and internship students that we supervise, which will benefit us all. Thank you for your consideration of the program, Lynn Oliver, PCC-S/LCDCIII Manager, TCN Substance Use Services Division

Comment: 
Wright State University (WSU) has two undergraduate degree programs that prepare students for the Addictions treatment jobs described in this proposal: BS in Rehabilitation Services (BRS) and BA in Social Work (BSW). The BSW graduates are able to apply to become Ohio Licensed Social Workers (LSW). Only bachelor level practitioners with an LSW can be hired in a job that has the title, “social worker”, including “substance abuse social worker”. WSU students in both the BRS and BSW programs can obtain the Ohio Chemical Dependency Counseling Licenses, complete an internship in a substance abuse counseling program, and get hired in a substance abuse counseling setting. BRS students are required to take an Addictions and Application course and students of both programs can take substance abuse courses offered across campus in Psychology, Sociology, and Rehabilitation Services. Further, an LSW, under the supervision of a Licensed Independent Social Worker (LISW), is able to diagnose and treat persons with addictions, an additional Medicaid billable service than someone without the LSW.