Bachelor of Applied Science in Addictions and Integrated Treatment Services

Institution: 
Clark State College
Approval Status: 
Preliminary Request
Comment Period: 
Fri, 03/19/2021 - 9:00am to Fri, 04/02/2021 - 9:00am

Comments

Comment: 
This would be a direct duplication for the University of Findlay (UF) Social Work degree with a minor in Substance Use Disorder (SUD). The benefit of the UF four-year accredited social work program means you can work anywhere with the SUD- a four year in that specifically would still be very limited due to license. Honestly, you don't even need the SUD part to work in social work, if you graduate from an accredited program and pass the LSW exam- that is the ticket to work with any population, including those with SUD. The SUD alone really can be done outside of a university setting- it is a 20-hour training from the state that anyone can do to be eligible to apply for the Chemical Dependency Counselor Assistant license.

Comment: 
The program appears to overlap with the BS in Substance Abuse Counseling at the University of Cincinnati. We believe the document discusses some areas for employment for this degree that are inaccurate. A person with the LCDC II credential is limited to working only with individuals with SUD; they are not eligible to treat mental health disorders. Social Workers with a scope of practice in SUD can treat both mental health and SUD. One reason counselors with SUD are in demand is because Medical Social Work pays so much more than this area of Behavioral Health counseling. The VA is the largest employer for Social Workers and they hired with a beginning salary closer to $ $60,000 -75,000 per year. Following is a more detailed analysis from faculty in our program. Scope of Practice Concerns. Throughout this proposal, Clark State is noting the specific training their program provides for graduates to be able to treat individuals with cooccurring disorders. This is actually beyond the scope of practice for an LCDC III, who are only allowed to treat Substance Use Disorders. For instance, in the proposal it reads: “No other Baccalaureate level program in the state of Ohio is currently educating and training graduates in the disciplines of both mental health and addiction.” (p. 3) This statement suggests they do both, and it is also not true. The UC School of Social Work is providing training for Mental Health and Addictions, an effective partnership between the School of Social Work and Substance Abuse Counseling Program. Graduates are encouraged to get their LSW along with their LCDC III. If not providing a bachelor's in social work together with the addictions training, it is more appropriate to refrain from suggesting graduates will be able to treat disorders other than substance use disorders (SUDs). The UC Substance Abuse Counseling Program trains students in the knowledge of mental health disorders, but also clearly provides clear direction for scope of practice limitations. This is also the reason you see differences in our co-occurring disorder course. We emphasize knowledge and referral. Clark State emphasizes treatment strategies. Clark State might suggest they are training individuals treat SUDs who have co-occurring disorders (subtle, but important difference). However, they suggest “The Addictions and Integrated Treatment Studies Baccalaureate degree will be the first of its kind to educate and train future treatment providers to be proficient at treating co-occurring disorder clients.” (p. 3) As they are well-aware of the other bachelor's program in the state, this comment suggests they are doing something new. Treating substance use disorders among those diagnosed with another mental health disorder (i.e., co-occurring disorders) is not novel. The UC Substance Abuse Counseling Program trains students to understand the risk factors associated with co-occurring disorders, treatment strategies for addressing the SUD within their scope of practice, and effective collaboration and referral strategies with integrated and other interprofessional teams. The structure of the program and language suggested throughout this proposal indicates scope of practice is not well considered and/or communicated. Distance to UC program is irrelevant, as UC is an online program. Lack of discussion with UC Substance Abuse Counseling Program. It is clear the Clark State faculty has engaged in discussions with Wright State, but they did not reach out to UC to explore articulating the associates with the bachelors at UC. UC is very transfer friendly, accepting 32 credit hours of free electives combined with general education requirements, the transition to the bachelor’s degree is made easy. We would be glad to discuss these options and collaborate with Clark State. Internship "benefits" are actually a burden on students. Students in the Clark State program will be required to take 2000 hours of field service, and there does not appear to be any commitment by the partners to hire these students until after they graduate. For some, if not all, this may mean volunteer hours. In the UC Substance Abuse Counseling Program, we provide the flexibility for our students to apply paid or unpaid internship hours into our program, but we only require 600 hours. Students have the option to complete additional training hours, with many fulfilling the 2000 hours in paid positions before graduation. If a Clark State student does not work in a paid internship, they will be required to complete 2000 hours of unpaid labor (2000 hours is estimated as a year of full-time work), without the option for a reduction in required hours. Capacity for Supervision? Supervision is intensive. It is uncertain if there will be class size limits on internship, which many accrediting bodies restrict (e.g., CACREP requires a 12:1 ratio). If class size is limited, one new full-time faculty is not likely enough to cover the number of students they plan to serve over four semesters per student. Curriculum comparison is inaccurate. We teach more addictions-related courses, offering substantially all the content provided in their course descriptions, with the exception of treating co-occurring disorders. They also suggest we do not offer two multicultural course or two internship experiences, which we do. There are some strengths in their group training, as they include a lab, which is not provided in our curriculum. Furthermore, their capstone course includes an intensive research experience. We provide volunteer research experiences, as this skill is not needed in practice or desired by most undergraduate students. Making this a requirement may be a deterrent and prove to be a major obstacle just prior to graduation. In effect, students will have spent a lot of money without finishing their degree if they cannot succeed in their research project. Our capstone course focuses on a culminating experience where students apply their knowledge of the SAMHSA TAP 21 Competencies. Multicultural Training Not Fully Addressing the Intersecting Needs of Diverse Populations. In the Clark State curriculum, they offer two multicultural course, Special Populations I and II. In these, students take four modules on gender, poverty, corrections, disabilities, and geriatrics. Racial and ethnic minority as well as LGBTQ+ populations are not discussed, many of whom experience substance use disorders at elevated rates. Furthermore, this segregated approach is antiquated and negates the role of intersecting identities of both the client and counselor. The proposal state that “No other Baccalaureate level program in the state of Ohio is currently educating and training graduates in the disciplines of both mental health and addiction.” (p. 3) This statement suggests they do both, and it is also not true. The UC School of Social Work is providing training for Mental Health and Addictions, an effective partnership between the School of Social Work and Substance Abuse Counseling Program in our College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services. Graduates are encouraged to get their LSW along with their LCDC III. The UC Substance Abuse Counseling Program trains students in the knowledge of mental health disorders, but also clearly provides clear direction for scope of practice limitations. This is also the reason you see differences in our co-occurring disorder course. We emphasize knowledge and referral. Clark State emphasizes treatment strategies.

Comment: 
As a supervisor and therapist for over 30 years working in the field of addiction, and manager/therapist of a outpatient alcohol, drug and tobacco treatment program providing services in Clark, Champaign and surrounding counties, I support Clark State College development of the Bachelor of Applied Science in Addiction and Integrated Treatment Services. For years I have experienced the on-going difficulties of hiring trained, experienced and appropriated licensed chemical dependency candidates. In rural communities recruiting local, commuting distance appropriate, experienced candidates has been a huge challenge. During my career working with clients struggling with addiction, the knowledge and experience in both addiction, mental health and clinical skills is imperative to provide clinically appropriate treatment for people struggling with addiction. Treating the disease of addiction is a multi-facet approach, as the disease effects all aspects of a persons life, including mental health and/or mental illness an individual may have been struggling with for years. The focus and training the Clark State BAS AITS degree offers, addresses the actual challenges a person struggling with the disease of addiction is experiencing. Offering such a program supports treatment facilities in need of qualified, trained employees, and provides a clinically well balanced, educated student.

Comment: 
This program, as proposed, would be a duplication of Tiffin University’s Bachelor of Arts in Psychology with a concentration in Addictions Counseling. The end goal of both programs is for students to be able to qualify for the second highest level of chemical dependency counseling licensure in the state of Ohio, which is the LCDC III. The only higher level of licensure is the LICDC (Licensed Independent Chemical Dependency Counselor) which requires a master's degree and allows the person to do more supervising and work without direct supervision. Further, students at Tiffin University who take CSL 310 Introduction to Addiction Theory and Practice, the first course in the sequence of addictions counseling courses, can qualify to obtain their Chemical Dependency Counselor Assistant (CDCA) credential. With this credential, they can begin working in the field with community partners and accruing the necessary hours toward the next level of licensure while they are still students in TU’s program. If students choose to do this, between this and their required internship, they can complete most, if not all, of these hours before they graduate with their bachelor’s degree, much like the practicum requirements of Clark State’s program. While there is a need for training programs, in the case of this proposal, it appears that a theoretical, true disciplinary/interdisciplinary coherent foundation is lacking. In consultation with colleagues who are independently licensed to assess, diagnose, and treat substance use and mental health disorders, as well as supervise, and who teach and supervise in Tiffin University’s program, we have concluded that such a program is best anchored through one or more academic disciplines—and even better with a multidisciplinary and a grounded theoretical focus. This provides needed depth and breadth that compliments technical skills this licensure and treatment competencies require. Merely technical and practical skills while necessary, are not sufficient. In addition to the concerns already noted, Tiffin University disputes the supporting program analysis of our program. Most, if not all of the areas noted as deficiencies in our program are either a class—or more importantly—covered in other course content; either in specific addictions counseling classes or psychology courses that are part of the psychology core required for this degree. Again, this speaks to the benefit of anchoring such a program through one or more academic disciplines like several of the existing addictions counseling programs, (Tiffin University included) already do. For example, the program analysis purported that Tiffin University does not have coursework specific to family counseling. However, we have an entire course dedicated to this: CSL 445 Theory and Practice of Relationship Counseling in Addictions and Behavioral Health. More specifically, the course description states that this “course is an introduction to the family as a dynamic relationship system focusing on the effects of addiction pertaining to family roles, rules, and behavior patterns. In this course students will gain a broad background in the marriage and family intervention and counseling techniques in the treatment of addiction and other behavioral health concerns”. The analysis also stated that Tiffin University’s program does not have coursework covering dual diagnosis, however, this is integrated into several of our counseling (CSL) courses, namely CSL 310 Introduction to Addiction Theory and Practice, where the concept is introduced, CSL 435 Assessment and Diagnosis of Addictive and Behavioral Health Problems, where dual diagnosis is examined in the assessment and diagnosis process, and CSL 440 Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment Planning in Addictions, where students learn how to engage in intervention and treatment strategies for those with a dual diagnosis. Trauma/Crisis Intervention which was also listed as absent from TU’s program on the analysis is covered in much the same way: integrated into other courses. Additionally, we have a semester long course titled FOR 430 Crisis Intervention, which students can take as one of their five required upper division level electives. Further, the analysis stated that Tiffin University’s program was lacking "treatment techniques with lab". While students do not have to register for separate lab courses, skills-based training is integrated into several of our courses. For example, CSL 320 Counseling Procedures and Strategies with Addicted and Disordered Populations course is a knowledge and a skills-based course where students engage in multipole role plays and video record mock sessions which they have to analyze, both individually and as a group. A similar format is used for CSL 435 Assessment and Diagnosis of Addictive and Behavioral Health Problems, where students utilize the counseling lab to conduct video recorded mock assessments and practice assessing and diagnosing substance use disorders, as well as learn to recognize mental health disorders and the possibility of an existing dual diagnosis. In CSL 425 Group Process and Techniques with Addicted and Disorder Populations, students participate in mock groups, must develop and facilitate mock groups, and have to develop a manual for conducting a series of groups. Most of the courses in Tiffin University’s Addictions Counseling concentration offer opportunities for practicing treatment techniques and counseling skills. Lastly, the program analysis contended that Tiffin University’s program does not cover special populations. Not only are special populations (including examining the needs of the LGBTQ community, children and adolescents, women, those who are homeless and/or living in poverty, the elderly, immigrants, those with disabilities, those in the military, and various cultural and ethnic groups) addressed in CSL 310, the very first course in the sequence, all addictions counseling students are required to take a semester long course on working with special/diverse populations called CSL 430 Cultural Competence in Counseling, which takes a deeper dive into working with many of the aforementioned populations.

Comment: 
Clark State College’s BAS/AITS program proposal represents a duplication of chemical dependency-related content in an existing program at Malone University in Canton, Ohio. The Bachelor of Arts in Applied Psychology, with an Emphasis in Chemical Dependency Counseling, leads to license eligibility for the CDCA Preliminary and the CDCA Renewable through the Ohio Chemical Dependency Professionals Board. This program will be fully online by the 2022-2023 academic year. Students who are working within the chemical dependency field, can apply for either the LCDC II or LCDC III by completing the coursework within this program and accruing 2,000 hours of their work-related experience in the chemical dependency counseling field under clinical supervision. Malone University had planned to offer a required internship that consisted of 2,000 hours of clinically supervised chemical dependency counseling as part of this program. However, it was determined collaboratively by the President and Chief Executive Officer of a prominent substance abuse treatment facility and by graduate counseling and psychology faculty members that this would be a burdensome and unreasonable requirement for most undergraduate students. Malone University also offers a Bachelor’s-Level Minor in Chemical Dependency Counseling. This minor also leads to license eligibility through the Ohio Chemical Dependency Professionals Board. Students who are majors in such programs as Social Work, Nursing, and Criminal and Restorative Justice can also minor in Chemical Dependency Counseling. It is important for undergraduate students completing education on the provision of chemical dependency counseling services to have contextual education that provides a foundational background for working with individuals with substance use disorders within specialized disciplines (e.g., psychology, social work, nursing, criminal justice, etc.). There is a significant discrepancy between the legal definition of scope of practice for licensed Chemical Dependency Counselors and the focus of Clark State College’s BAS/AITS program. In the proposal, Clark State College stated, “This BAS/AITS program will focus on the clinical aspects of Addictions treatment and Mental Health screening which is in the scope of licensure they are eligible for at this level” (p. 3). Clark State College’s BAS/AITS program proposal also states, “The purpose of this degree is to prepare students to work in the field of cooccurring disorders that is addictions and/or mental health treatment and recovery” (p. 17). According to the Ohio Administrative Code 4758-6-01 regarding the scope of practice for all levels of Chemical Dependency Counseling licensure in the state of Ohio, graduates of this program would not be eligible to administer or interpret mental health screening, treat co-occurring disorders (unless they are substance use disorders), or provide mental health treatment. They are only eligible to practice within the parameters of substance abuse treatment of alcohol and/or drugs. Clients must be referred to other professionals for mental health treatment (e.g., Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Professional Counselors, Psychologists, etc.).

Comment: 
This program overlaps with the basic preparation offered by two majors at Bluffton University: psychology and social work. Both provide the foundation for careers in substance abuse counseling. The proposed program is very narrowly construed, not providing the range of preparation that should be available for a student who earns a bachelor’s degree in the social sciences. Students will not be prepared for other fields beyond this narrow, technical area. In a similar vein, the list of potential jobs on page 8 is misleading, since in some cases students would need graduate degrees and would not have adequate preparation through the proposed program.

Comment: 
I love my classes at Clark state, and my teachers. To have this degree option would be helpful. It would be helpful to have it available with the teachers I get along with and at an environment that I am comfortable with. This is a great option for those who are interested in this field.

Comment: 
This program would be great and inexpensive. I really enjoyed attending Clark State. Please bring a Bachelor Program.

Comment: 
Good day. My name is Lynn Oliver and I am the Director for the TCN Substance Use Treatment Division. TCN is a community dual treatment agency with facilities in 8 cities in 5 counties in Ohio. As an administrative hiring supervisor, I am strongly in support of Clark State’s Applied Bachelor degree in Addiction and Integrated Treatment Services During the past 5 years, there has been a steady decline in the number of qualified candidates for our Substance Use Counseling positions. To be clear, we do not have a specific “Substance Abuse Social Work” position in our agency, but hire social workers, mental health, and chemical dependency counselors to work with our substance use disordered clients. We have many CDCA applicants, but are reluctant to hire them due to a lack of relevant experience and billing opportunities for them. When we bring Masters level Social Workers onto our teams, we spend an inordinate amount of time teaching them diagnostic, motivational interviewing, and group skills, especially in the area of substance abuse treatment. To be frank, we have had better outcomes with 2-year degree SWA/CDCA employees, but due to Behavioral Health Redesign, they are not viable option for hiring with our agency for the reasons mentioned above. Clark’s State’s proposed degree would allow us to have a pool of candidates that are immediately able to engage in the treatment of our substance abuse clients. I understand that there is concern that the proposed 4-year degree would result in diagnosis and treatment outside of scope of practice. As a clinical supervisor, ethics are of the utmost importance and this has not and would not be an issue. For example, our current LCDCII and LCDCIII counselors who are completing Master degrees in MH counseling are permitted to note MH symptoms on an assessment. They then refer the client to a licensed provider for diagnosis and treatment. Clark State’s program would teach students to recognize the mental health symptomology at a Bachelor level. That is an invaluable skill in this time when the majority of our clients have co-occurring disorders and our treatment model is designed for those clients. Thank you very much for considering this degree program. Lynn Oliver, PCC-S/LICDC Director, SUD Treatment Services.

Comment: 
It’s a shame to see so many oppose this opportunity for Clark State. I am a graduate of Clark State’s 2 year Social Work program and have went on and completed my BSW, and one thing I know for sure, is I would have chose to complete my 4 year degree at a local institution. Nobody wants to attend UC or Tiffin or other university programs. I understand that the Higher Education system, and Clark State may not have all the inside connections to make this degree possible, but our community needs this. We need more qualified professionals in the field. I own my own business in this field and I know how hard it is to find good people to work. Again, I think what’s most important is where the student wants to attend college and get their education. We support local! We support Clark State!

Comment: 
As an alumni of Clark state studying education and human services, I have a particular interest in substance abuse counseling. The ability to continue my education at Clark state would be an incredible opportunity for me. After obtaining my associates degree, I have been pursuing a bachelors in middle childhood education with the intention of obtaining a masters in school counseling. I am still exploring options, but I am interested in pursuing substance abuse counseling licensure. The ability to obtain such licensure from a school with which I am already familiar is ideal. I have greatly enjoyed my time at Clark state and would be grateful to be able to continue my education here.

Comment: 
It is always great news that a program like this is coming to the local community. A program, I’m sure if it’s approved by the state is adequate enough to bring the same type of education as these 4 year programs are all commenting that they have, will be more awarding and affordable to its local community. For me, I would rather have an adequate affordable option that is local other then going $20,000 to $40,000 more in debt for the same thing. Well done Clark State and I highly encourage the state of Ohio to see this program through. The DOA treatment field needs a lot of help out there right now and needs people for the recovery community that has the proper education and training to meet the needs. What we do not want, are good people wasting a lot of time and debt to pay back when there are great local options to take into consideration to get the people we need out here.

Comment: 
As a current student of Clark state who is working on their associates of applied science for social services technology this program would be a huge game changer for me. My main passion is to work in the addictions and treatment field and to be able to help people who are struggling in addiction. I want to be able to further my career and already being a Clark state student it would be a lot easier to have the bachelor program there as well.

Comment: 
While chemical dependency continues to be a major ill in our society, there is no evidence that another degree program is needed. Students can earn a bachelor's degree in any behavioral science (e.g., psychology, social work, criminal justice, nursing), complete a certificate in chemical dependency counseling, and earn the LDCIII with the addition of work experience and a passing score on the ADC exam. There are multiple pathways for students to do so at Ashland University: students can earn a BA in psychology/minor in Addictions Counseling or a BSW in Social Work/minor in Addictions Counseling or a BS in Criminal Justice/minor in Addictions Counseling or a BS in Nursing/minor in Addictions Counseling and not only have completed all of the academic content required for all levels of chemical dependency counseling certification but also graduate with a broader degree that allows them to choose from multiple career fields. The proposed program duplicates multiple degree offerings from universities across the state. It should be noted that Clark State's statement that the BAS/AITS program would prepare students to "work in the field of co-occurring disorders that is addictions and/or mental health treatment and recovery" is in opposition with the Ohio Administrative Code 4758-6-01 that states chemical dependency counselors are not qualified to administer or interpret mental health screening, diagnose mental health, treat co-occurring disorders, or provide mental health treatment. More broadly, is the concern that the mission of community colleges is to provide technical training and foundational academic coursework for students who seek to transfer to a public or private 4-year institution. It is essential that community colleges continue to serve students they were historically meant to serve. The decreasing number of high school students already threatens the large number of public and private baccalaureate institutions in the state without community colleges duplicating baccalaureate degrees that are already widely offered across the state.

Comment: 
Hello, I am the Executive Director for the MHDAS Board of Logan and Champaign Counties. I want to voice my support for the Clark State program. We have very few higher education options close to home in either of our counties and Clark State is one of the few. We know that on top of the cost of college, many people looking to go back to school or entering college after high school are mindful of the distance, the time involved and the ability to continue other life roles while getting a degree, when deciding where to attend. Having an option within 30 minutes of home would make a difference. Additionally, I can attest to the great need for more qualified workforce candidates for local behavioral health providers. It is no secret that the need for both mental health and addition treatment providers is growing greatly, and in a rural community it is extremely difficult to attract and maintain a quality workforce. We appreciate all efforts to encourage and make easier a pathway to getting the education and credentials for providing treatment services. Thank you Clark State College for your partnership and willingness to try and meet community needs in this way.

Comment: 
I believe this new degree should be added and offered as we are seeing it as a problem in our community more. This will allow people to get the correct training to be able to then help. #APPROVE

Comment: 
I am a student at Clark State in the Social Work Technology program with a graduation date of December 2021. I fully support the Bachelors program in addictions and integrated treatment services. There are so many people who can benefit from it, myself included. I know there are other schools like the ones in the comments here that says it’s a duplicate program of one of theirs which sounds like each school wants the monopoly on a Bachelors in Addictions but having choices of where to go for your Bachelors is extremely important. It is important for students who want to be able to go to a classroom and have that face to face contact with their instructors. It’s important for students to be able to have options in what their education is going to cost. It’s important to be able to have a lot of support from their instructors and classmates and to know that it won’t take an hour to get together for study groups and for instructor face to face meetings. All the schools with Bachelors in Social Work with an emphasis on Addictions are far away from Clark State and most Clark State students live in the area of where Clark State is and many of those students are older and can not just go away for school for 2-3 years which is why it’s important to have the option of being able to get their Bachelors in Addiction from a school close by.

Comment: 
I believe that Clark State Community College has the best interest of their students and faculty. With a degree such as this, they would be giving students a great opportunity. I am a Clark State alumni. I came back to Clark State because I enjoy being here. They make it simple, they help guide you. This would be a great degree for students and faculty.

Comment: 
I am in support of having this degree. Being a current student, many people that I am in classes with most want to pursue a bachelor’s degree but are unsure of the route take. This would be a great thing for students. Carin Burr is one of the professors I have thoroughly enjoyed with Chemical Dependency and with her direction and expertise, I feel very confident once I leave Clark State in my current major, I will be heavily prepared with the knowledge to better help serve and help someone. This would be a great win for Clark State and the Social Services department. With opiates and different substance abuse topics still big in our communities, people have questions and answers that need addressed and with people wanting to acquire that knowledge, this will make this major very helpful for someone to be acquire these skills. I support 100%!

Comment: 
I feel that this program would open the doors for many individuals who want an education in this field but have families and a job. Clark state offers smaller classes and the environment is wrapped around student success. The bachelors degree program embraces lived experience and offers the support of faculty that have worked in the field and continually stays in touch with those who deal every with addiction every day. I am a student in the Applied Sciences social work technologies program. I am due to graduate this spring. I personally would rather stay where I am at to further my education. The need in the communities that surround us is great. The field of addictions will require many more trained professionals and this is what Clark state can deliver. The hands on experience that is gained in the associates program is invaluable. I support this move forward a 100%

Comment: 
This degree would be a tremendous asset, not only to the students who would like bachelor’s degree opportunities closer to home, but also for the people who we will be serving once we obtain said degree. Ohio is in desperate need for addictions related programs and degrees, and Clark state has the creme de la creme professor, Carin Burr, that is perfect to ensure that this degree program is taught in the most effective way possible with a lot of knowledge to add to the curriculum. I strongly urge that this Bachelor’s of Science degree be added to the degree programs that Clark State can offer. Ohio is depending on it.

Comment: 
As a graduate of Clark States Social Work Technology program in August of 2020, I most definitely believe there is a need for this program close to home. I now work with children of all ages who not only seek Behavioral counseling but we see now more than before children are beginning to seek other ways of coping, drugs/alcohol/vaping. This would be most fit for someone like me to continue my education close to home while working full-time in the service field and gaining more knowledge and understanding of the new day and age of recovery. These things change DAILY and it is an overwhelming feeling of knew knowledge that is at our fingers tips. I 100% believe this program would be an amazing start to a lot of different people's journeys towards helping others! I'm with you all the way Clark State!!

Comment: 
I fully support this degree for Clark State. Personally, It will be nice to have this type of degree offered closer to home as well as obtaining my Associate of Applied Science degree already through Clark State then being able to go directly for my BAS-AIT. Even if other univerities offer this, having it offered at Clark State will be amazing and very benefical for the students. When it comes to education we need to be able to have more options, new options and with staff that have a passion to teach us all that we need to know, and I feel Clark State and the staff that will be engaged with this program will do just that. I fully support the BAS-AIT at Clark State.

Comment: 
Stop making this a money game! It's not about bragging rights for schools and their programs! I am currently working at ground zero with SUD clients and the amazing thing is that once all the drugs and alcohol get cleared up and out of the client's system, amazingly enough there are other underlying problems besides drugs and alcohol. It is very understandable that we as clinicians have to practice in our scope and yes, LCDC III is geared toward SUD, BUT would it not be a very wise idea to offer programs at as many schools as possible to help train people in recognizing signs and symptoms of co-occurring disorders? If Clark State is a school that could potentially offer a program that can get more people in the field to help with turning the tide in a war that have claimed so many lives and destroyed families, then why wouldn't this be feasible. It's time we stop fighting each other and start fighting the real enemy. I am all for equipping as many people as possible with knowledge and support, add this to the empathy and willingness to the individuals that have chosen this field in the first place, a lot of good can be done. In this day and age "networking" is a huge tool for people to use to better the quality of one's life, whatever is being offered to help this pandemic of mental health and SUD, let's embrace it and not put barriers in the way. At the end of the day I want to know that I helped as many as I could and that I am fighting to make a difference, this should be based on the human spirit, not what school's name is on my diploma.

Comment: 
As a current Clark State student finishing up my Associate's in Applied Science soon I would absolutely LOVE to continue my education through Clark State and receive a bachelor's.

Comment: 
As a current student of Applied Science at Clark State, this opportunity would be game-changing. I will be able to work in the field as a CDCA while I finish my Associate's, then gain my LCDC 2 and continue to work in the field as I get my Bachelor's. I cannot afford to go to a four-year school or move closer to one. The options for an affordable, quality education are very few, especially in-person. Being close to home in a hands-on environment with great professors who have years of experience in the field and having an extended social network with my fellow students is invaluable. Learning from professors who work in our communities, finding work ourselves and doing practicums in our own communities allows us to have working knowledge and a networking base that we just could not get through an online college or program. It's real-world experience and knowledge. Not to mention having this opportunity for so many people to further their education close to home would contribute greatly to the needs of the local job force as well as the health and wellness of our own communities! We get educated here, we work here, we help here. It would be a huge blessing across the board.

Comment: 
Unfortunately, there has been a rise in the need for dependency services. This isn't just about improving accessibility of education for students who will become treatment/service professionals, it is also about a community in desperate need of graduates who will join the healthcare force in order to help a large population in need, which will be priceless in investment return. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (drugabuse.gov) has many articles on the importance of treatment intervention; research shows that dependency continues to escalate and one of the contributing factors is not having enough programs available to keep up with the needs of the hardest hit communities.

Comment: 
The majority of students at Clark State remain in the service area after complete their 2-year degree or certificate program. It is very unlikely that students graduating with an Associates of Social Work Technology or with any of the 3 short-term certificates in Chemical Dependency or recovery will continue their education at one of the 4-year institutions who are disagreeing with this proposal. Such 4-year institutions have many barriers for our local students who have families, full-time work requirements, family obligations in the area, and financial barriers not allowing enrollment in a traditional 4-year institution. Without this Applied Bachelor degree in Addiction and Integrated Treatment Services, most of Clark State's Social Work and Addiction Studies' students will enter the field with a 2-year degree or certificate only and will not experience the financial opportunity an advanced degree will offer. Students graduating from Clark State with this Applied Bachelor degree will be prepared to enter an in-demand field and be better qualified than most with the degree's focus on mental health and substance abuse, a focus not found in other programs.

Comment: 
This is the most amazing awareness people in our society need more. This is great opportunity to many of us.

Comment: 
As a brief explanation of the addictions licensure process in Ohio... The LCDCII/III and the LICDC are the only clinical licensures in Ohio not aligned with a specific academic major or degree. John Ellis, a faculty member of the School of Social Work at The University of Akron comments, "I was on the Board at the time of this specific discussion, and I can attest this was by design. It ensures license applicants, the new generation of addictions professionals, come from a wide array of academic disciplines (e.g. psychology, social work, nursing, etc.). The LCDC/LICDC licensures are limited in their scope. They’re not independently recognized for reimbursement by insurance panels, and are only permitted to provide substance use disorder specific counseling. As many Ohio Addictions Treatment programs are now moving towards dual certifications (Mental Health & Addictions), agencies are looking to hire persons with a wider scope of practice. Thus, job opportunities and/or upward clinical mobility for persons with only one LCDC’s/LICDC’s are dwindling. Ultimately the role of higher education is to place students into the best position for vocational success. They would have better career options, at a similar cost and time commitment, by taking addictions curriculum embedded into an existing clinical degree."

Comment: 
I currently attend Clark State Community College, taking one of the SWK courses Chemical Dependency III. I had recently completed Chemical Dependency I, and II to be qualified for a Chemical Dependency Counselor Assistant Preliminary Certificate( CDCA). I'm taking Chemical Dependency III to be qualified for the Phase II CDCA. In addition I am also an alumna of Clark State Community College 1993, with an Associate Degree in Applied Science, major Early Childhood Education. With having a lived experience with substance use disorders, I have learned through my education experience through the courses that specifically focus on Chemical Dependency that a lived experience is not enough. I have learned how the chemical contained in a substance effect ones body and every aspect of ones life. I never understood how it affected my life until I took these courses. I aspire to further my education and there is no other place I would want to do this than Clark State Community College, this proposed program would certainly be convenient to me because of it's locality, in my community. The face-to-face experience is so much rewarding because it gives much more life to the learning experience. I want to be more informed and be a qualified candidate for what every facility chooses me as a part of their team. This program is what we need.

Comment: 
The College of Social Work supports Clark State’s proposal for a Bachelor of Applied Science in Addiction & Integrated Treatment Services in recognition of the critical need to increase the licensed chemical dependency counselor workforce in our state. Our support notwithstanding, we are responding to correct a number of factual errors contained in the proposal and to address multiple misconceptions regarding social work academic programming in general and programming at Ohio State specifically. Clark State College’s proposal states: "The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) promotes strict guidelines for social work education programs for accreditation. Coursework must include topics in all of their nine identified areas of competency including social justice, policy practice, and research methodology which relate more to advocacy than to clinical practice. The areas of competency also include engagement, assessment, and interventions but at the intro level for the most part which they get in many Associate Degree level programs including Clark State’s. The competencies do not require specific knowledge in addictions studies or mental health, thus none of the BSW programs in or near our service area have more than one course in addictions studies and none in mental health specific studies…" "With the availability of the AITS degree, no longer will the field need to wait for students to become “seasoned” out in the field to become effective with clinical skills and therefor more effective treatment providers. No longer will supervisors have to take on the massive role of teaching these skills in the field, the students will be familiar and basically proficient in skills including Motivational Interviewing, Cognitive-Behavioral Skills Training, Mindfulness Therapy, and others. Students will not be asked to spend time, money, and effort on courses that are not necessary to the clinical treatment like courses in developmental disabilities or social work theory." The Clark State proposal omits Ohio State’s undergraduate social work program from its list of current undergraduate programs in Ohio that provide education and training in substance misuse. As a social work program that is relatively proximate (45 miles) to Clark State College, we found the assessment of the amount and quality of substance misuse and mental health curricular offerings in our social work curriculum to be highly inaccurate. Our program has long recognized the need to prepare baccalaureate students with an understanding of theories, assessment and diagnosis skills, and intervention and prevention strategies associated with substance misuse and recovery, and offers the following five courses at the 5000-level: • SWK 5805 Theories and Biological Basis of Substance Misuse • SWK 5806 Diagnosis and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders • SWK 5807 Preventing Substance Misuse • SWK 5808 Group and Relationship Approaches in Substance Misuse Treatment • SWK 5809 Intervening with Individuals Regarding Substance Misuse Social work students preparing for practice in substance misuse can complete all of these courses without extending their degree completion timeline due to the social work elective credit built into our major requirements. Further, for over five years the College of Social Work has offered an interdisciplinary Substance Misuse & Addiction minor, which allows students to select from social work, pharmacy, public health, human development and family science, women and gender studies, sociology, and kinesiology substance misuse coursework. Students can apply their coursework towards chemical dependency licensure educational requirements. Each year, approximately 70 students complete the Substance Misuse minor. In addition, students can complete their field placement in agencies that focus on substance misuse. Not every social work student intends to practice in the area of substance misuse. Those that do are very well prepared. In addition to offering five, rather than one, course on substance misuse Ohio State’s College of Social Work offers considerably more than “none” in mental health specific studies. As co-occurring mental illness is highly prevalent among individuals with substance use disorders and pervasive in many social work settings, developing skills in engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation with clients in need of mental health treatment is integrated throughout our required generalist practice courses. • SWK 3502 Foundations of Generalist Practice: an experiential course that facilitates students’ mastery of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills with individuals. The course includes modules on trauma-informed social work practice, crisis intervention skills, and suicide. • SWK 3503 Practice with Diverse Populations: students develop core practice skills underlying social work practice with diverse client systems. • SWK 3600 Introduction to Psychopathology and Social Work Practice: familiarizes students with the major mental disorders and intervention strategies that build on clients’ strengths and resilience. • SWK 4501: Practice with Families: addresses professional values, knowledge, and skills essential for effective social work practice with families. Emphasis is placed on family theory, strategies for intervention, practice skills, and ethics. The development of culturally competent practice is an integral part of this course. • SWK 4502 Practice with Groups: provides instruction on professional values, knowledge, and skills essential for effective intervention with small groups. In addition, our students have numerous social work electives that have a mental health focus, to include SWK 5016 Affirmative Practice with LGBTQ Individuals; SWK 5013 Integrative Body, Mind, Spirit Approach to Assessment and Treatment; SWK 5011 Loss and Grief; SWK 5023 Family Violence; and SWK 5012 Conflict Resolution. We would further observe that the comprehensive substance misuse and mental health curriculum we describe above includes content on Motivational Interviewing, Cognitive-Behavioral Skills Training, and Mindfulness Therapy that the Clark State College proposal suggested was absent from social work curriculum. As such, supervisors of Ohio State social work graduates with training in substance misuse do not have to “take on the massive role of teaching these skills in the field”. We are concerned about the authors’ choice to characterize learning social work theory as a poor use of “time, money and effort”. Chapter 4757.01 of the Ohio Revised Code defines the practice of social work as “…the application of social work theory and specialized knowledge of human development and behavior and social, economic, and cultural systems in directly assisting individuals, families, and groups in a clinical setting to improve or restore their capacity for social functioning, including counseling, the use of psychosocial interventions, and the use of social psychotherapy, which includes the diagnosis and treatment of mental and emotional disorders.” In order to prepare students for social work practice, our bachelor’s degree is organized around the Council on Social Work Education’s nine core competencies, representing the dimensions of social work practice that social workers are expected to master during their professional training. Those competencies address core theory and fundamental practice skills in engagement, assessment, intervention and evaluation – all critical skills for any professional discipline that presumes to provide intervention and helping services in any context. The competencies also include developing the ability to evaluate empirical evidence, a particularly important competency given the well documented gap between science and practice in the treatment of substance misuse. Finally, social work students develop competencies in both understanding and incorporating diversity in practice and identifying and responding to ethical dilemmas in practice. These are both foundational skills that if absent would render an individual ill-prepared to engage in any professional helping practice, if not harmful. There is considerable expertise in substance misuse research and training in the College of Social Work. Currently eight different College of Social Work faculty or research staff are principal investigators on federal or state funded research focused upon substance misuse intervention research, the development of educational curriculum in substance misuse, the implementation of substance misuse training grants, or the post-graduate training of practitioners, four additional faculty have recently concluded projects with total current awards for research and training of 16.8 million dollars. The Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Drug Misuse Prevention and Recovery is an interdisciplinary center housed in the College of Social Work that provides tools, training, and technical assistance to professionals nationally working to address collegiate substance misuse across the continuum. Since its establishment in 2014, the Higher Education Center has provided training to over 10,000 professionals and has facilitated over 76,000 online screenings to identify problematic substance use among students across the country. As we said at the outset, we are supportive of this proposal and wish Clark State College the best of luck in opening their new program. There is considerable need for such a program. With the increasing recognition of the value of interdisciplinary practice in addiction and mental health treatment we hope that our feedback will better inform an understanding of social work education in general, and education for substance misuse and mental health practice at Ohio State in particular. We look forward to opportunities to collaborate with Clark State College in the training of candidate for a master’s degree in Social Work. Tom Gregoire, PhD, MSW - Dean Ramona Denby, PhD, MSW - Associate Dean for Academic Programs Jennie Babcock MSW, LISW-S – BSSW Program Director The Ohio State University College of Social Work

Comment: 
I am a current student at Clark State and I am in full support of this program!!! I have seen first-hand just how bad the chemical dependency issues are in this area. We do not have enough people out here who are qualified to do this work. This program is so badly needed it's not even funny. I was originally planning to transfer to a 4-year university, but they are so unbelievable expensive, that this is just not an option for me. There are many out here who face the same issues I do with this. Clark State is much more affordable, easier to access, smaller classes, and they have instructors who know what they are doing!!! If this program becomes a reality, I for one, will definitely be signing up. Please make this happen, not just for me, but for all of those out here like me who want and need this awesome program!!!

Comment: 
I am the Coordinator for Counseling Services at Clark State. This program has my full support. Carin Burr and Tammy Watt are excellent faculty members. Clark State attracts passionate and talented students, who would love to be able to complete a Bachelor degree here and continue working in our surrounding communities. In turn, these students will be well prepared to work in the substance abuse field, having the knowledge of how mental health issues/trauma are influencing substance use disorders, They will be better equipped to recognize signs of a mental health crisis, help the client follow through with mental health treatment referrals, and participate in interdisciplinary treatment teams. I feel the added knowledge will be especially beneficial in helping clients overcome any stigma about seeking treatment.

Comment: 
I work in the counseling center as a Peer Recovery Support Specialist at Clark State. I fully support this degree program. I know homelessness here locally has become an increasing problem due to the pandemic and many of those folks are struggling with addiction/mental health and we need professionals highly trained in both to combat the problem. During my time as an advisor, I worked with many students that were in the Social Work program and most of their questions revolved around wanting a bachelors degree and wanting to work in facilities that helped people with addiction. I believe that this program would be an asset to not only our students but to our community.

Comment: 
As the CEO of the regions Community Mental Health Center, we have a workforce shortage in the area to treat substance use disorders. This program would be a vital resource to providing casemanagement, care coordination and support for integrated care. Our communities continue to struggle with substance use, high rates of overdose and suicide. We need to increase our workforce with trained individuals who are pursuing careers in this helping field. I am hopeful Clark State College will be granted this opportunity and our communities will have added expertise in treating addictions in an integrated care model. This program would be a tremendous asset to our organization's work and mission.