Bachelor of Applied Science in Data Integration/Database Adminstration

Institution: 
Cuyahoga Community College
Approval Status: 
Pending Comments
Comment Period: 
Fri, 12/08/2017 - 11:00am to Fri, 12/22/2017 - 11:00am

Comments

Comment: 
There are so many DB admin jobs in NE Ohio that this degree would great for. I know I will be signing up for classes as soon as they are available.

Comment: 
Jason, you are completely correct! Really hole your proposal gets the support and approval it deserves! You GO boy!!!

Comment: 
This would be an amazing opportunity for so many and would offer great value into many facets of the IT industry in NEO.

Comment: 
The University of Akron (UA) does not support this proposal. The program would overlap directly with UA’s B.S. – Computer Information System Programming and Web Development degrees. Both degrees have database management/data integration courses that prepare students for careers in Database Management, Database Administration, Database Design, Data Analysts, etc. This program would be located approximately 38 miles from the UA Medina location, approximately 35 miles from the main campus, and approximately 9 miles from the UA Lakewood location. Tri-C is in the NEO Regional Compact along with UA as defined by the Chancellor, and adding redundancy seems to be counter-intuitive. Logically it would be more efficient and cost-effective to expand the scope of an existing program in the State rather than launching a new one. With only 11% of the Fall 2013 entering cohort (as defined by the Three-Year Success Measures January 2017 report on the ODHE website) earning a two-year degree at Tri-C by the end of the third year, it is unclear how many students will be able to persist to complete a bachelor's degree.

Comment: 
The data cited by The University of Akron is taken from an ODHE report that was specifically produced in an attempt to provide a more accurate measure of success for two-year campuses as compared to the more traditional graduation measurements that have been focused exclusively on institutions whose business model is built around primarily serving full-time students.  The conclusion of the ODHE report was to say that the REAL three-year success rate of Cuyahoga Community College is 54%.  To cite only the 11% graduation rate from that report is either purposefully or inadvertently misleading.   While 94% of the freshman class at the University of Akron does enroll as full time students according to ODHE data, only 27% of Cuyahoga Community College students are able to attend full time for a wide variety of personal reasons.  We would be happy to provide numerous examples of students who took longer than three years to complete their degree because they were raising a family, working to support a family, or caring for a beloved family member.  Regardless of their journey, when these part-time students do eventually graduate, they are nothing but success stories. Their achievements should be celebrated.  We hope our colleagues at The University of Akron would agree.

Comment: 
Finding qualified, experienced DBAs in Cleveland is a challenge. It's fantastic that the IT Center of Excellence at Tri-C has taken up the challenge to provide a comprehensive DBA program locally, and work with community partners to develop externship/placement opportunities for students.

Comment: 
Chancellor Carey: I am writing in response to the Department’s request for public comment related to the Ohio Department of Higher Education establishing a program under which community colleges, state community colleges, and technical colleges may apply to offer applied bachelor’s degrees. As stated in House Bill 49, community colleges can apply to the Ohio Department of Higher Education to offer applied science bachelor’s degrees. One of the requirements of the law is that a degree can only be approved if there is an “absence of a bachelor's degree program that meets the workforce need addressed by the proposed program that is offered by a state university or private college or university.” To that end, AICUO has serious concerns about the following degrees that are currently offered by nonprofit institutions in Ohio: Bachelor of Applied Science in Data Integration/Database Administration Cedarville University: offers a bachelor of science degree in information technology management with a specific database administrator track. University of Findlay: offers a computer science degree with both web and database emphasis and computer systems emphasis programs. UF also enrolls a significant number of students from the Cleveland metropolitan area, meaning there is direct duplication of this degree. John Carroll University: offers bachelor’s degrees in data analytics as well as computer science, which offer the same curriculum components as the proposal. Malone University: offers a computer science degree with several different tracks, two being a business information track and an information technology track. Muskingum University: offers several majors and programs for which there is significant overlap with the proposed “bachelor of applied science in data integration/database administration” degree. Its computer science program has a long and strong history of graduating students with not only the technical skills to succeed in this field. Muskingum also offers an information systems program for adult degree completers. This program is aimed at students who are either working in the field or else have completed an associate’s degree. The information systems degree program provides not only technical skills such as database management and web applications, but critically, it also requires a foundation in accounting, statistics, and economics. Ohio Christian University: currently offers a bachelor of science in data analytics that “prepares students for a career in data analytics within the information technology area. Through this program, students define challenges in providing useful data acquired from multiple sources.” Tiffin University: offers a computer information systems degree with a concentration in system and network support. The proposal states that the occupation of database administration requires specific computer and network support skills, so the proposed program is obviously redundant. It is clear that students in Ohio already have multiple post-secondary program options that “meet the workforce need” of these proposed programs. Again, since Ohio Revised Code Section 3333.051 clearly states a bachelor’s degree proposed field cannot already be offered, it is very apparent that these programs should be denied approval. Many of the aforementioned institutions have provided their individual comments to your office on the proposed degrees as well. However, please be aware that given the short, near-Christmas timetable, this is not a complete reflection of every non-profit institution’s offerings in Ohio. We encourage the Department to reopen the public comment for more appropriate and well-rounded feedback to ensure that this process is not rushed through with unnecessary haste utilizing truncated feedback. Given the duplicative nature of the proposed degrees, AICUO firmly believes the law should be followed and these degrees should be rejected. Sincerely, C. Todd Jones President & General Counsel AICUO

Comment: 
The AICUO seems to be misinterpreting the law as passed by the Ohio General Assembly.  The law does NOT say that a degree cannot be approved simply because there is an existing bachelor’s degree program in existence somewhere else in the state.  Instead, the language says that the Chancellor may approve a program if the local workforce need is not met, including if it is not being met by another university offering a similar program.  This is an interpretation that has been agreed to by Ohio Department of Higher Education’s legal counsel. This law has always been about meeting the workforce needs of Ohio employers. As clearly evidenced by the support of local employers contained within the degree proposal and through public comments, they believe that their workforce needs are not being met.  

Comment: 
All Ohio public universities have accredited programs in at least some of these areas, and several (Youngstown State, Akron Univ, Cleveland State, Univ of Cincinnati) have programs specific to database administration. Some of these universities are in the same regional compact as Tri-C, compacts that were recently established in statute to, among other things, examine unnecessary program duplication, enhance collaboration and share resources and curriculum. IUC recommends that Tri-C should instead consider engaging with its regional compact partners in a collaborative approach, such as guaranteed transfer pathways. There is a question of faculty qualifications, as only oneTri-C IT faculty member has a Ph.D. There are also questions of the workforce demand as described in the proposal, which does not apply specifically to database analysts, and does not correspond with OhioMeansJobs information.

Comment: 
The program suggested by CCC, “B.A.S. in Data Integration/Database Administration” overlaps with Malone University’s computer science degree, particularly two tracks in Malone’s program: Business Information track and the Information Technology track. Students coming out of BA programs like Malone’s would be prepared for the jobs described in this proposal and in the Shanahan document cited as evidence. If current programs in IT/Computer Science were at capacity in NE Ohio, the logical solution might be the addition of capacity. But such is not the case, and the Shanahan report itself (Shanahan p 25) notes that simply adding capacity at the baccalaureate level will not remedy the gap on any near term timeline. (The report also notes shortages in skilled workers at the certificate and AA level, perhaps a more aligned opportunity for CCC.) While there is shortage of graduates in IT fields in general, the solution to the skills gap in this area is not a new program, but rather incentives to encourage more Ohioans to enter this field. Sincerely, D. Nathan Phinney, Ph.D. Provost Malone University 2600 Cleveland Ave NW Canton, OH 44709

Comment: 
Kent State University does not support the Tri-C proposed Bachelor of Applied Science in Data Integration/Database Administration. The Tri-C program overlaps with Kent State’s Bachelor of Technical and Applied Studies (BTAS) degree with a concentration in Computer Technology Application Development, as well as with Kent State’s Bachelor of Science in Digital Sciences with concentrations in Digital Systems Analysis and Digital Systems Management. The Kent State BTAS Computer Technology Application Development concentration has database management and programming/data integration courses that prepare students for careers in database management, database administration, data integration, database design, etc. Graduates of Tri-C computer-related programs currently can seamlessly continue from Tri-C into this Kent State program. The BTAS degree program is offered on all of Kent State’s regional campuses and fully online. Kent State also offers a bachelor’s degree in digital sciences with concentrations in Digital Systems Analysis and Digital Systems Management that also overlaps content with the proposed Tri-C program. Graduates of the Digital Sciences major have been hired as data analysts, PM analysts, IT systems analysts, solutions consultants, support analysts, project managers, and operations analysts. Additionally, Kent State University offers relevant majors and minors in Computer Forensics and Security, Computer Information Systems, Business Analytics, Computer Science, Computer Engineering Technology, and Healthcare Systems Management. The Kent State BTAS Computer Technology concentration is in the process of being approved as a new major for fall 2018, to be called Information Technology and including concentrations in application development, networking and health information technology, among others. Kent State University is currently working with Tri-C to establish an agreement in which the Information Technology major will be offered first on the Tri-C Eastern Campus and then move to other Tri-C campuses as dictated by student demand. The IT program is quite portable and will be offered via online, hybrid and face-to-face. Kent State University is also working with Tri-C to establish an articulation agreement that will allow students to seamlessly transfer Tri-C coursework to fulfill requirements in Kent State’s Digital Sciences major . Kent State has long had a fruitful relationship with Tri-C, with many 2+2 articulation agreements developed between the two institutions. We believe that continued collaboration on developing course-transfer articulations with Tri-C is more efficient that creating new programs that will simply duplicate programming in the same region. Additionally, there are three major public universities and one major private university within an hour drive of Tri-C campuses, all of which offer multiple computer and IT programs.

Comment: 
YSU cannot support this proposal, as it would be in direct competition to existing programs already offered here and at other area universities. State legislation now requires that all universities within a region, both two and four-year, enter into a regional compact to provide greater efficiency for the delivery of higher education throughout our region. At the same time as we are being required to join together to become more efficient, CCC is requesting support to add a 4-year program that will duplicate existing efforts. Such an effort would be counter-productive to the State's stated goal of decreasing costs for higher education. In addition, several of the statements made by CCC within their proposal improperly characterize the existing programs. For example, our CIS and IT programs have capacity to enroll more students. Our faculty work closely with industry throughout the region to provide hands-on learning opportunities. And many of our students participate in internships or co-op experiences, or are enrolled part-time while completing courses in the evening or online. With the online option, our program is already available to students in the Cleveland area. Rather than embarking on an effort to create a new program, it would be more effective for CCC to work with partners across the region to provide the desired services to place-bound students. YSU has partnered with CCC in other areas, and would look forward to exploring opportunities to do so in support of this initiative.