Bachelor of Applied Science in Industrial Automation

Institution: 
Sinclair Community College
Comment Period: 
Fri, 12/08/2017 - 11:00am to Fri, 12/22/2017 - 11:00am

Comments

Comment: 
This is a good move for Sinclair. Currently the Dayton Cincinnati corridor is in great need in this career field. It allows student to better their education and fulfill a need in the local region. Sinclair's Mission has always centered around providing services to create a more educated workforce for the region, and this program helps with the areas need.

Comment: 
I am in support of this bachelors program. There is a need for applied bachelor programs that will create career opportunities and support the economic development of our region and beyond.

Comment: 
Yaskawa America, Motoman Robotics Division fully supports Sinclair Community College's Applied Bachelor's Degree application as part of our partnership with Ohio’s educational institutions. Yaskawa's Workforce partnership with Sinclair Community College and the new Applied Bachelor Degree will provide Sinclair undergraduates with industry level robotic and manufacturing 4.0 skills and credentials to fill the job gap in Advanced Manufacturing needed here in Ohio and around the USA

Comment: 
I think this program will offer a solution for the problem of people wanting to further their education in the automation field, that does not currently exist. The demand for experienced people in this field is growing. I think Sinclair Community College is a great fit for this program.

Comment: 
The University of Akron (UA) does not support this proposal. The proposal indicates that highly qualified faculty are available to teach in the program, but no CVs or information about these qualifications are provided. Nevertheless, the budget indicates a large start-up expense for curriculum development by an outside entity. This leads one to believe that the SCC faculty will neither develop nor control the curriculum, which is a basic tenet of faculty rights and responsibilities in higher education. This also raises questions as to the quality and rigor of the curriculum, and therefore the value of the degree proposed. With only 8% of the Fall 2013 entering cohort (as defined by the Three-Year Success Measures January 2017 report on the ODHE website) earning a two-year degree at SCC by the end of the third year, it is unclear how many students will be able to persist to complete a bachelor’s degree.

Comment: 
The data cited by The University of Akron is taken from an ODHE report that was specifically produced in an attempt to provide a more accurate measure of success for two-year campuses as compared to the more traditional graduation measurements that have been focused exclusively on institutions whose business model is built around primarily serving full-time students.  The conclusion of the ODHE report was to say that the REAL three-year success rate of Sinclair College is 44%.  To cite only the 8% graduation rate from that report is either purposefully or inadvertently misleading.   While 94% of the freshman class at the University of Akron does enroll as full time students according to ODHE data, only 29% of Sinclair College students are able to attend full time for a wide variety of personal reasons.  We would be happy to provide numerous examples of students who took longer than three years to complete their degree because they were raising a family, working to support a family, or caring for a beloved family member.  Regardless of their journey, when these part-time students do eventually graduate, they are nothing but success stories. Their achievements should be celebrated.  We hope our colleagues at The University of Akron would agree.

Comment: 
Excellent initiative from Sinclair Community College! A strong academic preparation is needed to support Industry 4.0/Internet of Things! The future of manufacturing is high-tech and having a well-qualified workforce will strengthen our region and enable companies to grow. Right now, we at Festo have observed a big skills and qualification gap in advanced manufacturing training and education. To address this need, Festo partnered with Festo Didactic, Sinclair Community College and employers in the Greater Cincinnati region to create the Mechatronics Apprenticeship Program Partners or MAP². MAP² is an apprenticeship program leading to a 2 year degree (Associates degree). So, bringing a 4 year degree in Industrial Automation to the market would provide additional educational opportunities for our students; creating a win-win-win for students, employers and our communities. Yannick Schilly, COO – Festo Corporation

Comment: 
I have great reservations about this since community colleges should only be allowed to provide two year associate's degree programs. A bachelor of science in applied science will water down the universality of a bachelor's degree and cause confusion in regards to the academic preparation of the faculty in those programs. Only people holding a Masters degree or above should be allowed to teach in a BS degree program. There already exists programs in Manufacturing Technology with a concentration in Applied Robotics at the B.S. degree level at Ohio Northern University in the College of Arts and Sciences with well qualified faculty that is serving the manufacturing industry already. The addition of such a program at an Associate Degree granting type institution will only cause confusion.

Comment: 
The Automation and Controls Technology program at Sinclair Community College is structured around several instructors that hold Masters level Degrees. That, from my experience, could put in place a more than adequate 4-year program for In to award capable students with an applied bachelor's level education. I am sure the Ohio North program is also adequate, but at the same time we need to take into consideration the high demand of technicians the greater Dayton area is seeing for employees of this caliber. If SCC is granted this opportunity it will open doors for Dayton locals and those that work full-time to earn and learn skills at the higher level for an affordable tuition to better serve their employers.

Comment: 
Having gone through the Automation and Controls Technologies with Robotics associate degree program at Sinclair I feel like it ended at the point where most students would go on to make excellent maintenance technicians and only the few that had previous job experience would go on to become Controls Engineers. I entered the job field as a maintenance technician and was brought into the Automation department after about a year and a half. With more focus on project management, the location of Sinclair, and the low cost I will be enrolling when the program start.

Comment: 
The Dayton Region Manufacturer's Association supports Sinclair Community College's effort to create a baccalaureate degree in the field of industrial automation. We believe this degree will have a great impact on the manufacturing industry in the Dayton Region and on the community as a whole, providing employers with skilled employees and providing workers with the education they need to find good, local jobs.

Comment: 
I "Mickey Lutz" believe that bringing an Bachelor's degree in industrial automation to Sinclair college would be a very smart move. It is very hard to find schools in state that carry such a degree. Not to mention, there are several industrial companies in the state looking for employees in the field of automation. I personally would love to be the first student to register for this degree. I currently have my Associates in Automation and Control and want to eventually get my PHD in Automation, so this degree will get me that much closer to my goals in life. The core courses I had to take for my Associates degree had helped me in the engineering field that I am in today, and feel the economy is in much needs for such a degree like Industrial Automation that will lead to not only greater success, but a degree that that is affordable and valued in the states.

Comment: 
A Bachelor’s program in Automation from Sinclair would be a great value to me as someone employed in the Industrial Automation field. I am a graduate of the Automation and Controls Technology program at Sinclair. I would definitely return for a Bachelor’s Degree. It would make me more valuable to employers by building on the knowledge I have gained from my education and work experience. No other college in the Miami Valley, two or four-year, offers a program specific to Industrial Automation and Controls. Students with a full time career cannot feasibly drive more than a half an hour to attend a college without either their employer, education or family suffering. While Institutions for Higher Learning will say that the payoff for the families and employers is much greater in the end, it should not be the only option. Sinclair’s program will also make students employable earlier in their academic career by allowing them to achieve an Associate’s Degree while attaining their Bachelor’s Degree. This is extremely important due to the exponentially rising cost of education in the United States, especially among four-year institutions. I believe that all employers will see the benefit of a Bachelor’s of Applied Science program. Employers will be able to distinguish between a Bachelor’s of Applied Science and a Bachelor’s of Science in the same way that they distinguish between an Engineering and an Engineering Technology degree. In the past, a well-known college in the Dayton area tried to remove the Engineering Technology programs from their school. The faculty running the Engineering program said that they did not see a purpose in having a tech program and that everyone should get a theoretical instead of an applied degree. Due to the huge backlash of local employers that fund many of the projects at the school and employ their technical graduates, the college did not follow through with the plan. Industry needs both theoretical and technical degrees. In the same way, I believe most companies see the value in work experience along with a specialized degree.

Comment: 
Dayton and the surrounding areas offers many opportunities for someone with a BS in Industrial Automation so it would be nice to fill those positions with locally educated people. This summer I plan to graduate with my associates in the Automation Controls Technology with Robotics. I have already received a such a quality education I am personally excited for Sinclair to offer a Bachelor’s degree. The ability to take my education to the next level at a school that already hold in such high regard is very welcomed by myself and others I am currently taking classes with.

Comment: 
I’m a recent graduate student from Sinclair Community College with an associate degree in Automation and Control Technology with Robotics. I’ve set goals in my life and one of them is to get a bachelor’s degree in applied science focused in automation. For that reason, I started taking some classes to transfer to a 4-year university to get my bachelor’s degree. I found a lot of 4-universities offers a bachelor’s degree in applied science but it’s hard to find a university that offers a degree in automation or control. Also, I have been working in All Service Plastic Molding (ASPM) Inc. as an Intern/Automation Tech for about a year and the more I get into the field the more responsibilities I have. Saying that, I find myself lacking the communication and project management side of the job. Moreover, if there are companies mass produce parts, they will need automation to keep up with big demand. As a result, those companies will be looking for someone that has a degree in automation or control to build and maintain the automation equipment. These are reasons for me to be looking for this program to be offered and I’ll be the first to enroll in it. In conclusion, Bachelor of Applied Science in Industrial Automation is the best affordable degree offered that would help companies and technicians to give back to the community.

Comment: 
As a SCC student scheduled to obtain an Associate's in Automation and Control this spring, I am very excited by the possibility of a Bachelor's degree program. My positive experience in the ACT program at Sinclair has reinforced my decision to change careers to manufacturing. Since starting the program, it has been made clear just how much trained, educated individuals are in demand in this field. I believe having a Bachelor's degree available will attract students who, like myself, wish to continue their education past the Associate's degree offered. I was unsure of the path I should take after this semester regarding continued education. A Bachelor's at Sinclair would be an easy choice for me considering the quality of my instruction so far. Take into account the affordability of Sinclair, and I'm sure the program would provide a real boost to the Dayton community.

Comment: 
As a SCC student scheduled to finish an Associates in Automation and Control this spring, I am very excited by the possibility of a Bachelor's degree program available at Sinclair. My positive experience in the ACT program has reinforced my decision to change careers to manufacturing. While in the program, it has become very clear just how much trained and educated individuals are in demand in the manufacturing field. I believe a Bachelor’s degree program would attract students who, like myself, wish to pursue their education past the Associate’s degree currently offered. I was uncertain about my path after this semester concerning continuing my education. A Bachelor’s at Sinclair would be an easy choice for me considering the quality of my instruction so far. Take into account the affordability of Sinclair, and I’m certain a four-year program would be a real boost to the Dayton community and economy.

Comment: 
Sinclair Community College (SCC) needs a Bachelor's degree in Industrial Automation. Many college's in the local and surrounding area only offer Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Bachelor's degrees. These degrees do not cover Automation with Robotics, so SCC's two year Associates program receives many students from other universities and colleges to take the program. The other students come to SCC and get the required skills needed to work safely and efficiently in the manufacturing industry.

Comment: 
With the ever growing high demand for well qualified candidates, I am very supportive of Sinclair College expanding the educational options they offer. Sinclair currently offers workforce development programs, certificate programs, a journeyman's card program, and Associate's degree programs. The offering of the Industrial Automation Technical Baccalaureate Degree program seems like a logical next step. I appreciate that Sinclair continues to be ahead of the curve and LEADS our community.

Comment: 
With the ever growing high demand for well qualified candidates, I am very supportive of Sinclair College expanding the educational options they offer. Sinclair currently offers workforce development programs, certificate programs, a journeyman's card program, and Associate's degree programs. The offering of the Industrial Automation Technical Baccalaureate Degree program seems like a logical next step. I appreciate that Sinclair continues to be ahead of the curve and LEADS our community.

Comment: 
With the ever growing high demand for well qualified candidates, I am very supportive of Sinclair College expanding the educational options they offer. Sinclair currently offers workforce development programs, certificate programs, a journeyman's card program, and Associate's degree programs. The offering of the Industrial Automation Technical Baccalaureate Degree program seems like a logical next step. I appreciate that Sinclair continues to be ahead of the curve and LEADS our community.

Comment: 
With the ever growing high demand for well qualified candidates, I am very supportive of Sinclair College expanding the educational options they offer. Sinclair currently offers workforce development programs, certificate programs, a journeyman's card program, and Associate's degree programs. The offering of the Industrial Automation Technical Baccalaureate Degree program seems like a logical next step. I appreciate that Sinclair continues to be ahead of the curve and LEADS our community.

Comment: 
With the ever growing high demand for well qualified candidates, I am very supportive of Sinclair College expanding the educational options they offer. Sinclair currently offers workforce development programs, certificate programs, a journeyman's card program, and Associate's degree programs. The offering of the Industrial Automation Technical Baccalaureate Degree program seems like a logical next step. I appreciate that Sinclair continues to be ahead of the curve and LEADS our community.

Comment: 
Production Control Units, Inc. fully supports Sinclair Community College's Applied Bachelor's Degree program. This program will be a strong asset to the Automation industry in the Dayton market and surrounding areas.

Comment: 
We have had two of the mechanical associates program co op with our company. The results have been good. We have a fair mix of mechanical , electrical controls, software and hard ware in our product and we need to have students who can operate in power and control electronics. We are looking to bring in an intern from this program and will give Sinclair our feedback over the next few months.

Comment: 
A Bachelor’s program in Automation from Sinclair would be a great value to me as someone employed in the Industrial Automation field. I am a graduate of the Automation and Controls Technology program at Sinclair. I would definitely return for a Bachelor’s Degree. It would make me more valuable to employers by building on the knowledge I have gained from my education and work experience. No other college in the Miami Valley, two or four-year, offers a program specific to Industrial Automation and Controls. Students with a full time career cannot feasibly drive more than a half an hour to attend a college without either their employer, education or family suffering. While Institutions for Higher Learning will say that the payoff for the families and employers is much greater in the end, it should not be the only option. Sinclair’s program will also make students employable earlier in their academic career by allowing them to achieve an Associate’s degree while attaining their Bachelor’s Degree. This is extremely important due to the exponentially rising cost of education in the United States, especially among four-year institutions. I believe that all employers will see the benefit of a Bachelor’s of Applied Science program. Employers will be able to distinguish between a Bachelor’s of Applied Science and a Bachelor’s of Science in the same way that they distinguish between an Engineering and an Engineering Technology degree. In the past, a well-known college in the Dayton area tried to remove the Engineering Technology programs from their school. The faculty running the Engineering program said that they did not see a purpose in having a tech program and that everyone should get a theoretical instead of an applied degree. Due to the huge backlash of local employers that fund many of the projects at the school and employ their technical graduates, the college did not follow through with the plan. Industry needs both theoretical and technical degrees. In the same way, I believe most companies see the value in work experience along with a specialized degree.

Comment: 
Clippard Instrument Laboratory is supportive of Sinclair offering a 4 year degree in Industrial Automation. Clippard is a designer and manufacturer of pneumatic and fluid valves and actuators used in industrial automation, semiconductor, biomedical, analytical, and numerous other markets. We also see a great need for deeper training in the areas of robotic, electrical, mechanical, pneumatic and hydraulic technologies used in our business and many others around the world. We currently have 4 students in the MAP² program and others who have completed 2 year degrees at Sinclair in Automation and Controls Technology. This program would allow for further development of people and skills needed in our communities and many broad reaching markets. The advances in manufacturing, controls, automation, and communication technologies are allowing all of us to live better, more productive lives. It is crucial that we develop technically competent and skilled people to innovate and continuously improve how things are produced. Bill Clippard, VP of Operations - Clippard Instrument Laboratory Inc.

Comment: 
The Sinclair Community College Board of Trustees fully supports the development of a bachelor’s of applied science degree in Industrial Automation. This degree has received letters of support from nine companies and organizations, including the Dayton Regional Manufacturing Association, and is designed to fill jobs in the Dayton Region. With anticipated growth in jobs of 6% by 2025 in addition to a projected 20% replacement in coming years due to retirements, area employers have identified further workforce training as a critical need to reduce the shortage of skilled workers in this area of Advanced Manufacturing. The mission of Sinclair has always been to listen to our community and respond to meet its needs. As noted in the RFI response, a baccalaureate of applied science will fill the gap between a skills-based technician and the theory-based, design-oriented engineer. This degree will extend existing programs that are currently recognized by area employers for their quality. Sinclair has the qualified faculty and staff to develop, manage and deliver an advanced degree for students seeking to increase their technical background and develop skills in technical leadership. More than 20 states have recognized the important role that community colleges serve in providing the opportunity for bachelor’s degree programs that might otherwise be out of reach to individuals seeking additional education but held back due to location or cost. We appreciate that the state of Ohio is also forward-thinking in order to provide all of our citizens with greater opportunity. This degree is a logical extension of Sinclair’s mission to meet the needs of area employers and to constantly deliver outstanding quality at affordable prices. We strongly support this degree for the students of Sinclair and the employers of the Dayton Region.

Comment: 
Wright State, Univ of Cincinnati, Miami Univ, Ohio State Univ, and Univ of Dayton already provide the same or similar accredited programs. This proposed program also would duplicate the NW Ohio consortium of universities, colleges and technical centers that are consolidating resources, sharing equipment and resources, and providing guaranteed transfer pathways. The application indicates that an external entity would develop curriculum, which raises questions about faculty involvement, and overall quality and value of the program. The listed occupations that would be addressed by the program are those that are fulfilled by existing career/technical programs, trade apprenticeships or associated degree programs, some of which are experiencing a decline in demand according to the Ohio Labor Market Information. IUC recommends that Sinclair CC consider one or more collaborative options -- joining the NW consortium, and/or establishing guaranteed transfer pathways with regional compact partners.

Comment: 
The proposed Bachelor of Applied Science in Industrial Automation is designed to extend the technical skills of students who have earned an associate degree in a technical area while also providing the skills needed to become an effective technical leader and manager. The program extends associate degrees in Automation and Controls Technology. The CIP codes listed as Occupational Programs in the proposal appendix are consistent those of Wright State’s recently approved Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology program. This Wright State program provides opportunity for students completing the associate degree in Automation and Controls to complete a bachelor’s degree. Lacking a detailed curriculum, it is unclear the degree to which this may duplicate the Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology program.

Comment: 
The proposal states that, “…the degree seeks to provide a pathway for current industrial automation technicians to advance to positions where they supervise and manage…” However, the curriculum that they describe is typical of already existing mechanical engineering technology programs at other institutions in close proximity. The University of Dayton already has an ABET accredited program and is approximately 5 miles away. The University of Cincinnati and The Ohio State University also have BSA programs and are approximately 50 and 74 miles away, respectively. The data provided by Sinclair for this proposal the job title they selected is ‘Industrial Machinery Mechanics’ not sure this fits for the degree and curriculum they are proposing? Also, under Regional Trends, it show that new positions over the next 10 years will be 21, this doesn’t seem worth the investment for a new degree when there are others that exist. Sinclair does mention that there will be other openings due to retirements, these positions will likely be filled with employees that already have multiple years of experience in the field rather than new graduates.