Bachelor of Applied Science in Manufacturing Technology Management

Institution: 
Clark State Community College
Approval Status: 
In Review
Comment Period: 
Fri, 12/08/2017 - 11:00am to Fri, 12/22/2017 - 11:00am

Comments

Comment: 
Interested in pursing this program

Comment: 
I have been supporting CSCC as a business resource. I am encouraged by the activity that has taken place. I believe the output from this degree will be skilled candidates that will be in demand in our local communities.

Comment: 
Really excited to see that your Applied Bachelor degree is moving forward. This will help train more employees at a more affordable costs and will help fill the gap we are about to face with the wave of retirements.

Comment: 
The Manufacturing Technology degree proposed by Clark State is a dream come true for many businesses in our area starved of a trained and competent workforce. Successful completion of this coursework will provide dream candidates for us to hire in our businesses. These students will be fought over by many companies in dire need of employees with the technical skills and management training required to provide leadership on the shop floor and beyond. We are excited and we remain hopeful of the prospect of hiring graduates with a degree like this one.

Comment: 
The potential addition of the Bachelor of Applied Science in Manufacturing at Clark State is an exciting option and could be an excellent source of continued education for our internal workforce, specifically our leadership team. We are a growing company, so educational opportunities close to home are essential for our full time employees to ensure they can balance work, expanding their education, and their home lives. We are dependent on the talent we can retain and the opportunities we can offer. We have no doubt this new educational option will be a direct resource for our employees and our growing talent needs.

Comment: 
This gives employees an opportunity to develop skill at a quicker pace. If we see potential to invest in, that will help with our retention efforts as well. This is a very positive opportunity in our area.

Comment: 
Yaskawa America, Motoman Robotics Division fully supports Clark States Applied Bachelor's Degree application as part of our partnership with Ohio’s educational institutions. Yaskawa's Workforce partnership with Clark State and the new Applied Bachelor Degree will provide undergraduates with industry level robotic and manufacturing 4.0 skills and credentials to fill the job gap in Advanced Manufacturing needed here in Ohio and around the USA

Comment: 
There is no market need in Clermont for this degree (Clark State is not a competitor due to geography). Clermont is exploring a Manufacturing track in BTAS, but this is the early stages of discussion. This comment aside, we have no significant concerns that should impede the approval of this degree.

Comment: 
The Response from Central State University on the Application from Clark State to Offer a Bachelor of Applied Science Degree in Manufacturing Technology Management in Compliance with the 10 Business Day Public Comment Period Mandated by the Ohio Department of Higher Education The Circumstance Clark State submitted an application to the Ohio Department of Higher Education (ODHE) to offer a 4-year Bachelor of Applied Science degree in Manufacturing Technology Management. The ODHE requires a 10-day period for public comment before review of the application. The Response Central State University does not recommend Clark State’s proposal to offer a Bachelor degree in Manufacturing Technology Management. Central State offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Technology. There are two options in Industrial Technology: Manufacturing Management and Computer Technology. The program Clark State is applying for would be a duplication of our Industrial Technology program. The state of Ohio requires regional compacts of Ohio’s public colleges and universities. Central State and Clark State are in the same compact. Each compact has a number of charges. The charges can be summarized to include academic efficiency and workforce development cooperation. It is also noted that Clark State’s application is indicating that the primary CIP Code for the program is 14.3601 - Manufacturing Engineering; this CIP code is incorrect. Curriculum for engineering programs for ABET/EAC tracks are more rigorous than what has been outlined in the request by Clark State. Request for Information (RFI): Applied Bachelor Degree Programs The ODHE placed a Request for Information (RFI) in line with changes in the Ohio Revised Code to accept applications from community colleges wishing to offer Bachelor degrees in Applied Science as quoted below: “Ohio Revised Code (ORC) 3333.051, enacted pursuant to Amended Substitute House Bill 49 of the 132nd General Assembly, directs the chancellor of higher education to establish a program under which community colleges, state community colleges, and technical colleges may apply to offer applied Bachelor degrees.” The first round of applications was due on October 31, 2017. A second round of applications will be scheduled for the first quarter of 2018. Clark State’s Application Clark State submitted an application to offer an Applied Bachelor of Science degree in Manufacturing Technology Management (BAS-MTM) during the first round. Their rationale for offering such a program is to offer hands-on training in manufacturing and middle management to meet the workforce demands of the region. It is proposed that there is a shortage of workers in the region with sufficient hands-on application skills in manufacturing along with the necessary management background to aspire to higher levels of management within the industry. Clark State asserts that there are no other colleges or universities within the region that offer such a program to meet the workforce needs of the manufacturing industry. As Central State University and Clark State are in the same geographical location, the Location Quotient (LQ) for the manufacturing industry is equally applicable to both institutions. The existing faculty base at Clark State includes nine regular members with the highest degree obtained being the Master’s. None of the faculty appears to have a formal education in manufacturing engineering or a related area at the Master’s level or above. Clark State currently offers an Associate of Applied Science degree in Manufacturing Technology. This degree provides training in basic manufacturing skills to prepare graduates for direct entry into the manufacturing field. The argument presented is that what is lacking in their Associate’s degree is the core business and management curriculum to prepare these workers for further promotion into supervision in middle management. It was also suggested that the proposed degree in Manufacturing Technology Management would further prepare the student to be skilled in manufacturing processes in addition to having the required business skills for supervision and management. Clark State looked at programs in Ohio that would be similar to their proposed program. It was stated that the program most similar to theirs is the Bachelor of Science degree in Technical Operations Management offered at Ohio University. Also mentioned was the Mechanical Engineering Technology degree offered at the University of Toledo, which Clark State states is advertised to prepare students for opportunities in engineering and sales. Clark State also mentioned the Manufacturing Engineering program at Central State University. The program at Central State is not similar to their proposed degree because Manufacturing Engineering at Central State University is an EAC ABET nationally accredited engineering degree focused on the theory, analysis, and design of manufacturing systems. However, there was no mention of the Industrial Technology degree offered by Central State University and how it compares to their proposed degree. The Industrial Technology Program of Central State University The Industrial Technology program at Central State has roots going all the way back to the University’s founding in 1887. The State of Ohio created and supported a Combined Normal and Industrial Department offering teacher training courses and technical education. Central State University’s foundation is in Education and Industrial Arts followed by Army ROTC installed in the 19th century. The Central State University Industrial Technology degree offers two options: Manufacturing Management and Computer Technology. The Central State catalog describes Industrial Technology as “a field of study designed to prepare technical and/or management oriented professionals for employment in business, industry, education, and government. Industrial Technology is primarily involved with the management, operation, and maintenance of complex technological systems. . . ”. Furthermore, “The Bachelor of Science degree program in Industrial Technology addresses the need for technical professionals with specialized technical training.” Central State’s graduates have been placed in a variety of industries including manufacturing, utilities, food processing, aerospace, hospitality and entertainment. The majority of our graduates are placed in manufacturing processing, sales, and management. In describing the curriculum of Industrial Technology, the Central State catalog states, “The core of the technology curriculum builds upon a foundation of trigonometry and includes components of metals technology and machining principles, occupational safety and health, computer numerical-controlled (CNC) machining, computer aided-design and computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM); electrical circuits, digital electronics, microprocessors, programmable logic controllers (PLC), and statistical analysis. Throughout the program, a heavy emphasis is placed upon hands-on laboratory experiences and practical applications of the theory gained in the classroom lecture sessions.” Furthermore, 24 hours of business management courses are included in the core of the curriculum. Being that it is important to adjust the learning experience to replicate actual work settings, the catalog states, “A student majoring in Industrial Technology may participate in the Cooperative Education program. All Industrial Technology majors are encouraged to take part in the Cooperative Education Program, which offers students an opportunity to integrate classroom theory with planned periods of practical “real world” work assignments.” In lieu of formal co-op assignments, students are also encouraged to and supported in seeking summer internships. The Central State Industrial Technology program has an advisory committee comprised of local industry stakeholders and partners to provide feedback to the faculty and students. This committee meets with the faculty and students twice each year to provide direction toward serving the needs of industry. Organizations represented on this committee include TDL Tooling, Balluff, Department of Energy (DOE), Air Force Research Labs (AFRL), Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT), and Boeing. When Central State’s Industrial Technology program is compared to Clark State’s proposed program, the overlap in coursework, labs, work experiences, and stakeholders is significant. The Industrial Technology program at Central State is available to serve the needs of the region and fill any gaps in manufacturing skills. In fact, Central State entered into an articulation agreement with Clark State in 2012 to offer a pathway for their graduates with an Associate of Applied Science degree in Manufacturing Technology to a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Technology over a two-year period. Furthermore, Clark State and Central State signed an MOU to work collaboratively on future ventures. Clark State is aware of our Industrial Technology program as well as our Manufacturing Engineering program. Regional Compacts Ohio Revised Code Section 3345.59 requires regional compacts of Ohio’s public colleges and universities. Executed agreements are to be in place by June 30, 2018. Ohio will be divided into six regions or compacts. Central State and Clark State will be together in the West region, along with Edison State, Sinclair, and Wright State. The purpose of each compact is to agree on how collaboration will take place within the region in the nine areas outlined in the statute. The first area mentioned in the statute calls on institutions to examine whether unnecessary duplication of academic programming exists. Creating a new degree in Manufacturing Technology Management is a close duplication in programming. The commute between the two institutions is less than 30 minutes and Clark State included Greene County within its workforce scope, this distance would be considered an unnecessary duplication of academic programming. Furthermore, Central State and Clark State agreed to share a satellite building in Xenia to offer courses and programs in the heart of the city. The main selling point in this collaboration is the benefit to students taking classes at Clark State during the first two years at a lower cost before transferring across the hallway to Central State to complete their bachelor degree. Clark State’s proposal would cause direct duplication of this program and competition instead of collaboration, which would negate the agreement. Highlights and Reaction to the Clark State Proposal Clark State submitted an application to offer an Applied Bachelor of Science degree in Manufacturing Technology Management during the first round. Their rationale for offering such a program is to offer hands-on training in manufacturing and middle management to meet the workforce demands of our region. The application required the provision of the appropriate CIP Code for the proposed Manufacturing Technology Management program. The following was provided: 14.3601 (Manufacturing Engineering - Primary); 52.0205 (Operations Management and Supervision. -Secondary). Program will focus mainly on 14.3601 with blended learning outcomes of 52.0205 What Clark State is proposing is not an engineering degree, as CIP Code 14.3601 represents. A more appropriate CIP Code for this degree is Engineering/Industrial Management (CIP Code 15.1501). This is the CIP Code (15.1501) assigned to Central State University’s Industrial Technology program. The stated purpose of the proposed program is to offer hands-on training in manufacturing and middle management to meet the workforce demands of our region. Clark State asserts there are no other colleges or universities within the region that offer such a program to meet the workforce needs of the manufacturing industry. However, it is clear the Industrial Technology program offered by Central State University not only meets the need, but also is within the same region as Clark State. The State of Ohio requires public institutions of higher education to collaborate together regionally on a number of items for the purpose of strengthening resources and reducing redundancies. In the spirit of this statute, working collaboratively to meet the workforce’s need as Central State and Clark State had initiated versus working competitively, will benefit all concerned. Summary and Recommendations Central State and Clark State have been working together more in recent years than ever before, thanks to the persistence and dedication of both presidents. As these institutions continue to respect the autonomy and support each institution’s growth, the efforts will result in stimulating the emerging growth and strength of Ohio’s intellectual, workforce, and economic capital. Central State does not support Clark State’s application to offer a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in Manufacturing Technology Management, as it does not afford the region any unduplicated added benefit.

Comment: 
The University of Akron (UA) does not support this proposal. The degree would be a duplication of UA’s B.S. in Automated Manufacturing Engineering Technology. Although the UA degree focuses primarily on technical aspects of manufacturing (e.g., robotics and automation), there are equally significant aspects of the degree devoted to management and supervision within the manufacturing technology field. Logically it would be more efficient and cost-effective to expand the scope of an existing program in the State rather than launching a new one. With only 9% of the Fall 2013 entering cohort (as defined by the Three-Year Success Measures January 2017 report on the ODHE website) earning a two-year degree at CSCC by the end of the third year, it is unclear how many students will be able to persist to complete a bachelor’s degree.

Comment: 
The data cited by The University of Akron is taken from an ODHE report that was specifically produced in an attempt to provide a more accurate measure of success for two-year campuses as compared to the more traditional graduation measurements that have been focused exclusively on institutions whose business model is built around primarily serving full-time students.  The conclusion of the ODHE report was to say that the REAL three-year success rate of Clark State Community College is 41%.  To cite only the 9% graduation rate from that report is either purposefully or inadvertently misleading.   While 94% of the freshman class at the University of Akron does enroll as full time students according to ODHE data, only 33% of Clark State students are able to attend full time for a wide variety of personal reasons.  We would be happy to provide numerous examples of students who took longer than three years to complete their degree because they were raising a family, working to support a family, or caring for a beloved family member.  Regardless of their journey, when these part-time students do eventually graduate, they are nothing but success stories. Their achievements should be celebrated.  We hope our colleagues at The University of Akron would agree.  

Comment: 
I have great reservations about this since community colleges should only be allowed to provide two year associate's degree programs. A bachelor of science in applied science will water down the universality of a bachelor's degree and cause confusion in regards to the academic preparation of the faculty in those programs. Only people holding a Masters degree or above should be allowed to teach in a BS degree program. There already exists programs in Applied Manufacturing Technology at the B.S. degree level at Ohio Northern University in the College of Arts and Sciences with well qualified faculty that is serving the manufacturing industry already. The addition of such a program at an Associate Degree granting type institution will only cause confusion.

Comment: 
The Dayton Region Manufacturers Association supports Clark State Community College in its efforts to create a Bachelor of Applied Science in Manufacturing Technology Management. We believe that this degree will have a great impact on the manufacturing industry in the Dayton Region and on the community as a whole, providing employers with skilled employees and providing workers with the education they need to find good, local jobs.

Comment: 
Clark State has a visionary approach to addressing the needs of industry. The next generation manufacturing workforce will be interdisciplinary in nature and students entering the workforce will need to have knowledge in a variety of fields. An excellent example of this is the recent surge in additive manufacturing (AM) or 3-D printing. Persons will need to know how to design for AM and have a fundamental understanding of physics, lasers, optics, material science, and other fields. They will also need to understand the basic principles of business. Clark State recognizes this and their four-year baccalaureate program is designed to address this need. It is imperative that we educate the next generation manufacturing workforce beginning as early as possible, which is why I am working with both the Dayton Regional STEM School and Clark State. Manufacturing is now in the digital age that represents increased levels of precision and quality. This is what will once again put Ohio and the nation in a leadership position for manufacturing. Technology in this digital age is accelerating rapidly and a holistic hands-on approach is needed from elementary school to graduate research. The next generation manufacturing will require both the STEM disciplines and knowledge of business. In recent discussions with businesses in the Dayton Region, we have found this to be the case. Each of these companies enthusiastically supports the holistic, hands-on approach to educate the next generation manufacturing workforce being pursued by Clark State.

Comment: 
As Clark State continues to develop educational and training programs that develop the necessary skills and knowledge of the workforce in Clark County to support the manufacturing business in the area we support these efforts. This also give us an additional option when encouraging our employees to continue their education as we invest in their skills and knowledge to help retain the employees, develop necessary skills for promotion and plan for succession and replacement of both technical skills and leadership ability. The Bachelor option is attractive for those employees who have continued their education while working full time and raising families and will give them additional opportunities in the right geographical location.

Comment: 
Clark State has a visionary approach to addressing the needs of industry. The next generation manufacturing workforce will be interdisciplinary in nature and students entering the workforce will need to have knowledge in a variety of fields. An excellent example of this is the recent surge in additive manufacturing (AM) or 3-D printing. Persons will need to know how to design for AM and have a fundamental understanding of physics, lasers, optics, material science, and other fields. They will also need to understand the basic principles of business. Clark State recognizes this and their four-year baccalaureate program is designed to address this need. It is imperative that we educate the next generation manufacturing workforce beginning as early as possible, which is why I am working with both the Dayton Regional STEM School and Clark State. Manufacturing is now in the digital age that represents increased levels of precision and quality. This is what will once again put Ohio and the nation in a leadership position for manufacturing. Technology in this digital age is accelerating rapidly and a holistic hands-on approach is needed from elementary school to graduate research. The next generation manufacturing will require both the STEM disciplines and knowledge of business. In recent discussions with businesses in the Dayton Region, we have found this to be the case. Each of these companies enthusiastically supports the holistic, hands-on approach to educate the next generation manufacturing workforce being pursued by Clark State.

Comment: 
The Bachelor of Applied Science in Manufacturing Technology Management which Clark State Community College has obtained is an excellent first step towards a brighter future not only for Clark State but also for local companies and prospective students in the Clark, Champaign, Greene and Montgomery counties. For local companies, I believe this program will create a manufacturing talent pool which they can directly tap to fill full-time, part-time and apprenticeship positions. For prospective students, I believe this program will create a direct pipeline for students to move from the classroom to the manufacturing floor to possibly even the boardroom. All in all, I believe the Bachelor of Applied Science in Manufacturing Technology Management offers a win-win scenario for students, local companies and stakeholders throughout the Miami Valley.

Comment: 
Cascade Corporation is an enthusiastic supporter of the Clark State Community College Baccalaureate of Applied Science in Manufacturing degree. Our organization has formed a close relationship with this pioneering and innovative community college to provide hands-on, relevant, manufacturing education. The unique offerings of this degree program has prompted many employees who have been out of school for many years to re-enter education and pursue career opportunities that would require advanced education. Employees working full-time, coupled with family and other obligations, need the flexibility that Clark State and this degree program provides. The instructors, deans, and President of Clark State have been very supportive of our continued training and development needs, and have provided that onsite at our organization, frequently using our machinery and equipment. The variety of locations and flexibility of times classes are offered are additional features that will benefit many students, workers and organizations. Students, adults and employees who pursue lucrative careers in the manufacturing industry thrive with the direct relationship of the education to the work performed. While many of the traditional course offerings of four-year colleges is very valuable, our employees need the experiential education to be successful. During my many years in Human Resources and involvement with training and development in the manufacturing environment; myself and the manufacturing community has begged for a solution to the skills gap. I firmly believe this program is the solution and give it my unwavering support. The advanced careers offered in manufacturing for students pursuing the Baccalaureate of Applied Science in Manufacturing degree would be geared more toward technical expertise, coupled with some of the skills derived from managerial courses. Clark State has assembled a very knowledgeable Advisory Committee consisting of employers and educators to assist in guiding the curriculum. The resulting graduates will be skilled, technical, subject-matter experts that would catapult organizations and communities into sought after talent; resulting in advancement, economic growth and many other opportunities.

Comment: 
SelectTech GeoSpatial’ s Advanced Manufacturing Facility, located in Springfield, Ohio is acutely aware of the need to produce quality leaders to support our current manufacturing environment. We have been working with Clark State in the development of their Certificate and Associate programs to enhance manufacturing talent in the region. These programs are now beginning to supply needed technical talent required for maintaining and operating today’s manufacturing systems. Because of the past recession, the area and the region has lost many of our manufacturing leaders due to re-location or early retirement. During the economic recovery, industry in the region is now getting back on its feet. Soon, we will also see an even bigger demand for manufacturing leadership due to rebuilding the US infrastructure. Without programs like these, we will see industry leave for other geographies. Not only do we support the concept of BA/Manufacturing Technology Management at Clark State, we insist that is needed for the continued growth in the area and the region. Clark State is uniquely qualified to administer a program like this. Sincerely, Frank J. Beafore Executive Director, SelectTech GeoSpatial – Advanced Manufacturing Facility

Comment: 
There are several reasons why Clark State's proposed applied science degree in manufacturing makes sense for many reasons. The cost per credit hour would be considerably less than a four year state college or university. Students enrolled in a two year program but want to earn their bachelor degree in manufacturing wouldn't have to worry about transferring credits, thus saving time and a lot of confusion for the student; The baccalaureate degree would appeal to the incumbent workforce who want to advance in their careers by earning a four year degree without having to leave town or drive for hours after work to attend class. Clark State is recognized for offering innovative programs and most importantly, responding to the changing needs of the workforce. Obtaining a four year degree from CSCC would be an excellent value for many students who seek to build their skills for future career opportunities and an opportunity to bridge the talent gap in the manufacturing.

Comment: 
The Clark Co community and region would greatly benefit from this type of program. Businesses are continuing to worry about what will happen when their current talent retires. This program would enable area businesses to help create the curriculum of what is ACTUALLY NEEDED to become employed. Clark State Community College has done an amazing job working with regional partners and listening to the needs of area businesses. A program of this level will only increase the probabilty of training local talent and RETAINING that talent in our own community. Area businesses will benefit and perhaps have a capacity for growth, as well as more competitive wages, with the type of training to better meet their needs. I greatly appreciate the leadership and vision of Clark State Community College, and will be very willing to help communicate this new program to area businesses and Chamber members.

Comment: 
Clark State is an incredible workforce and economic development partner in Springfield and Clark County. Their aggressive approach to curriculum development and corporate training have become a hallmark of our successes with job growth. I know that when called upon they will produce incredible results, but more important, they are always working behind the scenes to prepare our workforce for the opportunities that lie ahead. With that, brings a tremendous amount of confidence in their entire organization. This degree program is further proof of their commitment to the development of our workforce!

Comment: 
Clark State has been and continues to be a great support for our local manufacturers in Champaign County. They continually expand their scope to provide the technical skills training needed in today's manufacturing environment. The addition of a bachelor's program will only enhance the availability of training for our workforce needs. This program is driven by demand of the customer (both business and workforce/student). The progressive attitude of Clark State is evident in this initiative.

Comment: 
We believe this degree will greatly help the local communities to better prepare for jobs locally. This is a great program, developed with the local leaders so that it will be successful. Please approve this great effort!

Comment: 
Ohio Hi-Point Career Center is in full support of Clark State Community College's new Bachelor of Science in Manufacturing Technology. This has great alignment with our curriculum and could give more students CC+ options that could lead individuals into this high need career field for our area.

Comment: 
Central State, Univ of Akron, Kent State, Ohio Univ, Univ of Toledo, Univ of Cincinnati, Bowling Green and Youngstown State offer the same or similar programs, accredited and with multiple co-op programs in place. The proposal classifies the wrong primary CIP code for the program. The occupational positions listed as being addressed by the proposal are not entry-level positions and require more skills than the proposed program would provide. The program description does not align with positions in employer projections. Other listed positions do not require a bachelor's degree. Clark State CC already has an articulation agreement in place with Central State Univ that provides a pathway for graduates of Clark State's associate of applied science degree in manufacturing technology to transfer to Central State's bachelor of science degree program in industrial technology. Clark State CC and Central State Univ are less than 30 miles apart and are located in the same regional compact region.

Comment: 
Chancellor Carey: I am writing in response to the Department’s request for public comment related to the Ohio Department of Higher Education establishing a program under which community colleges, state community colleges, and technical colleges may apply to offer applied bachelor’s degrees. As stated in House Bill 49, community colleges can apply to the Ohio Department of Higher Education to offer applied science bachelor’s degrees. One of the requirements of the law is that a degree can only be approved if there is an “absence of a bachelor's degree program that meets the workforce need addressed by the proposed program that is offered by a state university or private college or university.” To that end, AICUO has serious concerns about the following degrees that are currently offered by nonprofit institutions in Ohio: Bachelor of Applied Science in Manufacturing Technology Management Cedarville University: offers a bachelor’s degree in management with an operations management track. The proposal describes a very similar program to the one already offered by Cedarville. Muskingum University: This proposal would duplicate Muskingum’s bachelor of science degree in business management significantly. The Muskingum Adult Program (MAP) was designed to assist adults with existing jobs and careers in earning a degree on evenings and weekends. Specifically, the bachelor of science in business management degree currently offered by Muskingum University through the MAP program provides the educational framework required for “cost management, critical thinking, data analysis and statistics, and quality management and control.” Ohio Northern University: currently offers a bachelor of science degree in manufacturing technology. Started in 2012, Ohio Northern was cited by the Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering as “one of two institutions in the United States offering such a unique mix of professional programs, and the only one that has attained ATMAE accreditation for manufacturing technology with the concentrations in either management or applied robotics.” ONU’s program has also led to a 100% job placement rate among its graduates. Tiffin University: currently offers a management degree with multiple focuses. Two of those being supply chain management and logistics, both of which are the exact same focus of this proposal. It is clear that students in Ohio already have multiple post-secondary program options that “meet the workforce need” of these proposed programs. Again, since Ohio Revised Code Section 3333.051 clearly states a bachelor’s degree proposed field cannot already be offered, it is very apparent that these programs should be denied approval. Many of the aforementioned institutions have provided their individual comments to your office on the proposed degrees as well. However, please be aware that given the short, near-Christmas timetable, this is not a complete reflection of every non-profit institution’s offerings in Ohio. We encourage the Department to reopen the public comment for more appropriate and well-rounded feedback to ensure that this process is not rushed through with unnecessary haste utilizing truncated feedback. Given the duplicative nature of the proposed degrees, AICUO firmly believes the law should be followed and these degrees should be rejected. Sincerely, C. Todd Jones President & General Counsel AICUO

Comment: 
The AICUO seems to be misinterpreting the law as passed by the Ohio General Assembly.  The law does NOT say that a degree cannot be approved simply because there is an existing bachelor’s degree program in existence somewhere else in the state.  Instead, the language says that the Chancellor may approve a program if the local workforce need is not met, including if it is not being met by another university offering a similar program.  This is an interpretation that has been agreed to by Ohio Department of Higher Education’s legal counsel. This law has always been about meeting the workforce needs of Ohio employers. As clearly evidenced by the support of local employers contained within the degree proposal and through public comments, they believe that their workforce needs are not being met.  

Comment: 
Offering BA programs at a community college will allow students unable to attend a 4 year degree for a wide range of reasons (financial, family, academic, disciplinary) the opportunity to earn a degree and contribute to the every growing high tech manufacturing workplace. More options/opportunity can only be a good thing!

Comment: 
WE HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS PROGRAM. After interviewing over 20 recently graduated engineers from all local, 4 year universities for job openings at our manufacturing company (Contract Manufacutring of 3D Printed Medical Implants), we were extremely discouraged. Here these engineers came, with absolutely zero hands on experience and citing a senior project in the final months of 4 years as experience. We can't afford to to have new engineers 'figure things out' without having an understanding of how things are made first. Getting hands-on and rolling up their sleeves to see why a design is not working out, and trouble shooting has so much value. We opted take the route of more trade skilled workers because they had a sense of reality for what can be manufactured, while being flexible on their schedule so they can continue their education part-time. From day 1 of our involvement with Clark State, there has been much optimism about the program, and about the region's workforce development. Clark State is hitting the nail on the head, and we plan to send our own employees through this program. As a manufacturing company, we need this type of program.

Comment: 
The Ohio Manufacturers’ Association (OMA) supports Clark State’s proposed Applied Bachelor’s Degree. Ohio’s manufacturers have been feeling the strain of an unprecedented talent gap. As the more experienced and highly trained technicians and managers retire, our members must have a skilled and knowledgeable workforce ready to fill these roles, especially in critical middle and upper level positions. Clark State’s proposal is designed to fill this need by providing a pathway for incumbent workers. The proposed Applied Bachelor’s degree in Manufacturing Technology Management would be a benefit to not just the region’s manufacturers, but the entire state. The OMA is excited to see this proposal move forward.

Comment: 
WE HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS PROGRAM. After interviewing over 20 recently graduated engineers from all local, 4 year universities for job openings at our manufacturing company (Contract Manufacutring of 3D Printed Medical Implants), we were extremely discouraged. Here these engineers came, with absolutely zero hands on experience and citing a senior project in the final months of 4 years as experience. We can't afford to to have new engineers 'figure things out' without having an understanding of how things are made first. Getting hands-on and rolling up their sleeves to see why a design is not working out, and trouble shooting has so much value. We opted take the route of more trade skilled workers because they had a sense of reality for what can be manufactured, while being flexible on their schedule so they can continue their education part-time. From day 1 of our involvement with Clark State, there has been much optimism about the program, and about the region's workforce development. Clark State is hitting the nail on the head, and we plan to send our own employees through this program. As a manufacturing company, we need this type of program.

Comment: 
Clark State is a major player in our community and continues to do all possible to support our employers. Our employers have identified a gap in the necessary talent needed to operate their manufacturing businesses. This degree will provide the education and training needed in the manufacturing arena. Our focus will be on incumbent workers that will benefit from the opportunity to increase their skills and abilities. This program will be high quality and most importantly very affordable for the people in our community. The benefits of this program will extend throughout the state.

Comment: 
Clark State is a major player in our community and continues to do all possible to support our employers. Our employers have identified a gap in the necessary talent needed to operate their manufacturing businesses. This degree will provide the education and training needed in the manufacturing arena. Our focus will be on incumbent workers that will benefit from the opportunity to increase their skills and abilities. Completion of this program will result in outstanding achievements for individuals and well as positive measurable outcomes for employers. This program will be high quality and most importantly very affordable for the people in our community. The benefits of this program will extend throughout the state.

Comment: 
The proposed Bachelor of Applied Science in Manufacturing Technology Management is designed to provide training for middle level supervisors in manufacturing industries. The objective is to provide students with “management, soft, people, and problem-solving skills, as well as the advanced technical skills.” The CIP codes are consistent with those in several Wright State programs. Lacking a detailed curriculum, it is unclear the degree to which this program may duplicate existing bachelor degree programs in Management, Supply Chain, or Industrial Engineering.

Comment: 
Skyward is a local engineering services provider. One of the areas that where we expect rapid growth over the next several years is engineer to support additive and advanced manufacturing processes. These techniques have the potential to revolutionize manufacturing through optimized designs and mass customization. Skyward has found it very difficult to find employees with the skills necessary to do these jobs, and if this continues, it will hinder our ability to grow. The program proposed by Clark State is urgently needed. The skills that Clark State plans to teach such as CAD and additive manufacturing, combined with their hands-on approach to learning, are highly attractive to Skyward and we would even consider sending existing employees as a cost effective, local way to provide updated training. This program can't come soon enough!

Comment: 
I definitely support the offering of this 4 year degree through Clark State University. As a region, we cannot do enough to support what I see will be a key growth driver for the region and State through high-tech, multi-disciplinary "new collar" manufacturing jobs. With out a workforce that is engaged, developed at the seams of technical disciplines and ready to go to work and lead - we will simply not have the workforce that we need to meet demand and the region/State will lose. Having read through the above comments, I see most in support of this concept and a few that are commenting from a position of scarcity versus abundance, this mindset has to change. The reality is that the student population communities for Clark State are different than those of a traditional 4yr university - so while there may be similarities at the macro levels when you look at programs - there is no comparison in the theoretical versus deep hands-on immersion that will come from what Clark State will be offering to their student population. Let's get this program rolling!

Comment: 
I recently worked as a consultant providing technical assistance to Clark State re the TAACCCT grant that they used to further develop their capacity and expertise in manufacturing programs, both in infrastructure and program development. My particular assistance was in the area of helping the college develop a robust approach to assessing the prior learning (PLA) of potential students. Having such a program in place will allow them to attract, and retain until completion, individuals who bring previous learning experiences from industry, the military, internal company training programs, and other sources. Students who enroll having already earned identified national certifications in the areas of manufacturing and welding will receive credits in the program area that will create a savings intuition and time to completion. Having worked with Clark State faculty and staff and knowing their dedication to excellence, I unreservedly support Clark State's proposal for the Applied Baccalaureate.

Comment: 
The proposed program is significant similarity to several of our engineering technology programs, which are designed to provide a hands-on approach and give students the applied skills needed for success in the workplace. While Clark State emphasizes the connection with industry, it is also the case that nearly all of our engineering technology students are employed while enrolled, either part-time or full-time during off semesters, gaining the hands-on experience that will help them to be successful in their career. In addition, our new Bachelor of Engineering in Manufacturing Engineering also has similar related content. In both cases, the connection with our business college for key business content, available through appropriate course scheduling, would provide all of the skills acquired through this proposed new degree. It does not make sense for a State that is financially strapped to invest significant resources into a new program when there is already existing capacity throughout the state to support these needs. There is further concern that the proposed faculty do not have appropriate credentials to teach within the program. None have any technical background. The Higher Learning Commission requires faculty teaching at the bachelor’s level to have at least a master’s in the discipline, or a master’s degree with 18 hours in the discipline. It does not appear that many of the proposed faculty hold the required credential. Clark State suggests that traditional bachelor degrees are designed to teach book ‘theory’ and offer little hands-on experiences. This is an incorrect statement. While this is true of BE degrees, most, if not all, BSA degree have an applied focus rather than the theoretical focus. The BSA degrees incorporate applied calculus and core courses teach students how to use various machines/equipment and how industry works by applying the information to actual situations. Many of these BSA programs also include management courses within the curriculum (mechanical, civil, construction, etc). CSCC further discusses in their proposal that industry representatives are not finding that BE students have the skills that they are looking for. According to research including the 2017 study by the National Academy of Engineers titled, Engineering Technology Education in the US; most employers do not know the difference between BE and BSA degrees and could not identify their employees that had BE or BSA degrees.

Comment: 
On behalf of the Springfield-Clark CTC, I post this in support of Clark State's Bachelor of Applied Science in Manufacturing Technology Manufacturing. This is another positive option for young people to advance in the the manufacturing industry and to do so with constant collaboration and input from those already in the field.