Bachelor of Science in Culinary and Food Science

Institution: 
Cincinnati State Technical & Community College
Approval Status: 
Pending Comments
Comment Period: 
Fri, 12/08/2017 - 11:00am to Fri, 12/22/2017 - 11:00am

Comments

Comment: 
As the world’s population becomes more more fascinated with food and the science and cultural stories behind it, it in turn creates the insatiable demand for more things food. The industries that support food in any way shape or form is thirsting for more talent, more opportunities to share and grow with one another to be better food stewards. As someone who has had over 20 years in the food business from manufacturing to retail innovation to restaurants and food service, the future of having a growing talent pool of food lovers that have a passion for the culinary practices and the science that makes things like “umami” come to life for more than just chefs - well, is EXCITING! Imagine a world that can bring more food innovations and concepts to life faster, better - better for you, me him, her, them. Cincinnati launches food stars from all walks of life and industries. It draws curious talent from all over the world as well. How many non-Mid-western accents have you heard? Too many to count! The insatiable talent that lives here is what makes the possibility and potential of this 4-year program unpolished gem that is priceless. I hope you consider expediting your evaluation of this program. In your hungry gut, you know this is the tastiest curriculum for the Midwest to output. It is undeniable, and not exhausted yet, what the benefits are to Cincinnati State, the tri-State area and to food industries across the globe. Let’s get this on to the main course!

Comment: 
I was one of the first graduates of the culinokigy program..participated the the RCA committees..involved in laying the groundwork for the culinology programs and have worked in the industry as well as teaching at MCI as an adjunct/contractor for the past 11 years. I would like to be considered as one of the instructors for the proposed program.

Comment: 
I would like to speak in favor of the proposed culinary science program for Cincinnati State. As a Chef in the food Product R&D arena for over 19 years, I can attest to the fact that this area is growing. Many of the first generation food Product R&D chefs will be retiring and we will need bright young minds to backfill these positions. The time is now to act!

Comment: 
The Culinary program at Cincinnati State has been a draw for foodies across the country. We are attracting young culinary professionals into our town, which is already known as a food ingredient and manufacturing hub. Givaudan Flavors and fragrance, Wild Flavors and Specialty Ingredients (ADM), Mane flavor and Fragrance, General Mills, Kellogg, Kraft food and many others develop and/or manufacture products here in Cincinnati. Bringing creative culinary minds to Cincinnati and developing those who want to take their knowledge and influence in the food world further with the Bachelors program in Food Science will not only better Cincinnati by cultivating creative and ambitious young people , but with this program, these students will help change the face of the food industry by working to develop the healthier, more sustainable and (the reason we all love food) great tasting food products that the world is demanding. We want to keep those people in our town. We don’t want to develop this ambitious group of young people, just to lose them to Columbus, Indiana, or Kentucky to get the education that they need to make a difference.

Comment: 
I think it would be a fantastic idea for the program to gain New Life at Cincinnati State, where could be both marketed and executed in a fantastic learning environment

Comment: 
As a graduate of Cincinnati State, and The University of Cincinnati with a degree in Culinary Science, I am excited to see the rebirth of a Culinary Science Degree. There is tremendous talent and opportunity here in the Queen City, in both students, professors, and professionals alike. My understanding is that this program will be similar to the previous joint degree offered through UC. This type of degree is a launchpad of opportunities in the food and beverage industry. For instance, I have worked in grocery stores and fine dining restaurants. I have created cheese flavors through the process of enzyme modified dairy ingredients and meat flavors through reaction chemistry. I have created bakery goods, commercialized dressings, sauces, and seasoning blends. I currently create compounded flavors for the food and beverage industry. All of this work was done at different companies within Cincinnati. The tristate area is called the "Flavor Capitol of the Midwest". There is tremendous opportunity here and throughout the state of Ohio. I hope this program comes to fruition, and we can keep all the talent local.

Comment: 
As a graduate of Cincinnati State, and The University of Cincinnati with a degree in Culinary Science, I am excited to see the rebirth of a Culinary Science Degree. There is tremendous talent and opportunity here in the Queen City, in both students, professors, and professionals alike. My understanding is that this program will be similar to the previous joint degree offered through UC. This type of degree is a launchpad of opportunities in the food and beverage industry. For instance, I have worked in grocery stores and fine dining restaurants. I have created cheese flavors through the process of enzyme modified dairy ingredients and meat flavors through reaction chemistry. I have created bakery goods, commercialized dressings, sauces, and seasoning blends. I currently create compounded flavors for the food and beverage industry. All of this work was done at different companies within Cincinnati. The tristate area is called the "Flavor Capitol of the Midwest". There is tremendous opportunity here and throughout the state of Ohio. I hope this program comes to fruition, and we can keep all the talent local.

Comment: 
Cincinnati’s passion for food is smoking hot – just look at the dining scene. Once flyover country, Cincinnati is now stacked with culinary talent that rivals New York City. We have entered an “awakened” era in food history and there’s no turning back. Our collective food IQ is off the charts; we demand “clean” food; sustainably grown and ethically raised; and we expect restaurant-quality food even in the frozen aisle at the grocery store. Yes, even that boxed dinner in the freezer section. We live in a world that’s starved for time. We eat out when we can afford to, but more than ever, we want, no we NEED, food to be convenient – at home, at work, on the run. We need that new crop of chefs who can feed this ever-growing band of diners who want food to be convenient, “clean” and most of all, restaurant-good. We want this cadre of chefs who put out prepared/convenience foods to have sound understanding of food safety, nutritional value, regulations, manufacturing, packaging, shelf life – while staying grounded to culinary gold standards. Clearly, our demands and expectations have pulled ahead. Now where is the talent pool to deliver on these wants? Cincinnati State already turns out top-notch culinary talent that fuels this area’s restaurants. Why not take it to the next level? Extend this culinary track to include education and training in food technology, product development and any associated regulations. Now we’re giving our chefs the opportunity to impact food beyond the restaurants. Now we’re talking about impacting how the thousands and millions eat. There are countless farmers markets and at least 3 incubator kitchens in this area alone. Many food entrepreneurs are working on that next big thing – sauces, quiche, bottled cold-brew coffee, cocktail mixers, pierogis – you name it. This program at Cincinnati State could turn out the kind of workforce to expertly lead the advancement of specialty foods in this area. Cincinnati State has all the ingredients for this program. Time to get cooking!

Comment: 
I would like to speak in favor of the proposed culinary science program at Cincinnati State. As one of the first graduates of the first graduating class I have a duty to promote and support this program to the fullest. After being in the industry since 1991 as a chef cooking in the military, hospitals, nursing homes, hotels, restaurants and contract feeding companies I needed a change. I could have went the traditional route of enrolling in a food science program. But when I heard that there was a program that combined culinary arts and food science I was sold on the program. Being one the oldest chefs in the first graduating class, I knew I had picked a great way to expand my career options. This program will provide students with many career opportunities with top food manufacturing companies, retail grocery stores, QSR and fast casual restaurant companies. There are many companies currently searching for students with a dual culinary and food science education. So lets make this program the best.

Comment: 
As an alumni of the Midwest Culinary Institute and a food service professional, I can attest to the value this program would add to the school and greater Cincinnati area. We need to continue to innovate and expand our talent base and this would add yet another facet to that approach. Food product R&D is an important field, and would directly benefit many of the major employers in the area. I'm all for a culinology program that integrates Culinary Arts with science to produce well rounded and well prepared individuals to face new opportunities and challenges in food service and food R&D.

Comment: 
As a Culinology graduate and a professional in the Food Science Industry, specifically on the Flavor side, I am in extreme favor of this 4 year program. As a hiring manager there is nothing more fulfilling than finding local students that have graduated from a local program who want to work in the industry. Cincinnati is one of the most populated cities for flavor companies as well as food companies, this not only gives the students the perfect opportunity for internships but also finding a full a time job once they graduate.

Comment: 
If it wasn't for Chef Galvin's encouragement to apply to the original program, and Chef Yek's guidance throughout the program, I have no idea where my career would be. I've been blessed with a successful career/industry I absolutely love!!! I was in the FIRST graduating class of the original program through MCI and UC. I've gained a wealth of experience/knowledge in Quality Assurance, Casual Dinning, Quick Service Restaurants, Manufacturing, Meat Processing, Bakery, Sauce Development and much more!!! I HIGHLY recommend every Culinary student to dive their creative brain into the unlimited possibilities the Bachelor of Science in Culinary and Food Science will offer their career/life...it's an AWESOME AWESOME JOURNEY!!!

Comment: 
I'm comparison to other "Food Science" programs in the country, this program offers additional skill sets that stand out to companies and hiring managers. The Culinary Arts aspect of the program gives the students the proper knowledge of bench top cooking techniques that when used with the Food Science part of the program creates a valuable product developer that can take a kitchen made prototype, and turn it into a sellable/manufacturable product. This is only one of the incredibly useful aspects this program has provided me as I entered the workplace.

Comment: 
I believe the addition of this program would be a worthwhile Cincinnati State and the Midwest Culinary Institute. There are key food companies in the greater area that would value from these types of graduates, and more importantly, nothing quite like this program exists anywhere else. Being able to combine skills in Culinary Arts and food science will allow a graduate to demonstrate a wide range of skills and abilities appealing to employers large and small for the development of food products. The growing need to offer healthy food products is growing and equipping students with the ability to create tasty food, and then have the expertise to mass produce these items is a great skill set indeed! As a foodservice professional, I have colleagues within this field that are exremely important and adept at meeting the need's of multi-billion dollar corporations. I see a strong demand for this type of curriculum, as the quality graudate will go out and have a lasting impact on the economy at large.

Comment: 
I would highly recommend this degree to anyone wanting to make it in the food industry. This degree is critical to what the industry needs and you can truely choose your own career path. There is so much variety between culinary, product development, and commercialization you will never get bored. As consumers demands change in this industry there will always be an increased need for the blend of culinary and science. In my short 8 years in the industry I have bounced around the county and world even doing a short term work assignment in South Africa. So I would say it was critical to my success as well.

Comment: 
I would like to express my support for the addition of the Bachelor of Science in Culinary and Food Science at Cincinnati State Technical & Community College. This program would not only fill a void for the region’s food industry employers, but also offer a pathway for students looking to continue their education beyond the AAB level in Culinary Arts. As a graduate of a Culinary Science program and employee of one of the world’s largest food ingredient companies, I can attest to the value such a program provides and the need for bringing this program to CSTCC. As the food industry evolves to face the challenges of feeding the world’s population and the ever changing demands of consumers, there will no doubt continue to be a demand for Research Chefs, Culinary Scientists, Food Technologists and Food Scientists. This degree that blends the disciplines of Culinary Arts and Food Science offers a unique perspective and skillset that will serve graduates well and continue to be desirable to employers in all facets of the industry.

Comment: 
I m in favor of this program for the Greater Cincinnati area. I was an Adjunct Professor for the University of Cincinnati program. I have been a professor, mentor, and employer for numerous students. This program is justified by the number of flavor, food manufacturing jobs in the surrounding areas, as well as in the United States. The former students are employed by some of the largest food manufacturers, Top 10 Flavor houses in the world, and restaurants. The program brings strength to the current Culinary program at Cincinnati State, and will also bring new students from other programs around the nation, as it has done in the past. Students need a way to further their education locally. Many of the students are still employed in the Greater Cincinnati area, which certainly still brings income to the State of Ohio.

Comment: 
The RFI submission includes statements of support from local industry, but there is some question of the need for a bachelor's degree program for this field, based on OhioMeansJobs listings.

Comment: 
Chancellor Carey: I am writing in response to the Department’s request for public comment related to the Ohio Department of Higher Education establishing a program under which community colleges, state community colleges, and technical colleges may apply to offer applied bachelor’s degrees. As stated in House Bill 49, community colleges can apply to the Ohio Department of Higher Education to offer applied science bachelor’s degrees. One of the requirements of the law is that a degree can only be approved if there is an “absence of a bachelor's degree program that meets the workforce need addressed by the proposed program that is offered by a state university or private college or university.” To that end, AICUO has serious concerns about the following degrees that are currently offered by nonprofit institutions in Ohio: Bachelor of Science in Culinary and Food Science University of Findlay: offers a hospitality management degree which provides students with a career education that embodies and integrates applied management practices and theory. UF also directly enrolls students from the Cincinnati area. It is clear that students in Ohio already have multiple post-secondary program options that “meet the workforce need” of these proposed programs. Again, since Ohio Revised Code Section 3333.051 clearly states a bachelor’s degree proposed field cannot already be offered, it is very apparent that these programs should be denied approval. Many of the aforementioned institutions have provided their individual comments to your office on the proposed degrees as well. However, please be aware that given the short, near-Christmas timetable, this is not a complete reflection of every non-profit institution’s offerings in Ohio. We encourage the Department to reopen the public comment for more appropriate and well-rounded feedback to ensure that this process is not rushed through with unnecessary haste utilizing truncated feedback. Given the duplicative nature of the proposed degrees, AICUO firmly believes the law should be followed and these degrees should be rejected. Sincerely, C. Todd Jones President & General Counsel AICUO

Comment: 
The AICUO seems to be misinterpreting the law as passed by the Ohio General Assembly.  The law does NOT say that a degree cannot be approved simply because there is an existing bachelor’s degree program in existence somewhere else in the state.  Instead, the language says that the Chancellor may approve a program if the local workforce need is not met, including if it is not being met by another university offering a similar program.  This is an interpretation that has been agreed to by Ohio Department of Higher Education’s legal counsel. This law has always been about meeting the workforce needs of Ohio employers. As clearly evidenced by the support of local employers contained within the degree proposal and through public comments, they believe that their workforce needs are not being met.  

Comment: 
As a graduate of the BS in Culinary and Food Science from the University of Cincinnati in conjunction with Cincinnati State Technical & Community College I can attest that the program was the catalyst to my success in both career and life. Through the relationships and coop program of the schools I was able to meet my first employer. With the foundation of knowledge and education gained in the BS program, I have grown in tremendously in the ever booming food industry. I currently work for one of the top 2 breadcrumb manufacturers in the world where I often use the experiences from UC and Cincinnati State to support the growth of our company. This degree program needs to be reengaged so well trained individuals such as my classmates and I can continue to positively influence new items with the knowledge of how to make food taste delicious combined with the understanding of functional ingredients ensuring food safety, consistency, and accessibility. I am a huge supporter of this program and forever grateful for it providing me the base skills to success in my passion for food and my profession- which too is my passion.

Comment: 
Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments in favor of establishing the proposed Bachelor of Science in Culinary and Food Science at Cincinnati State Technical & Community College. I am a food scientist by training and have spent a decade of my career in the Greater Cincinnati area with major flavor companies. I also had the privilege of serving as an adjunct faculty member teaching food microbiology in the University of Cincinnati's (UC) B.S. (Culinary Science) program between 2008-2014. Based on my exposure to these two professional environments, my understanding of the nationwide need to develop additional food science programs, and the unique needs of the food industry in southwest Ohio, I unequivocally support this proposal. Historically, the Cincinnati Tri-state area has been a major flavor hub in the United States (including Mane, Givaudan, Wild, Frutarom, etc.), however, today the city is also a major food industry player comprising small, medium, and large-sized multinational food and beverage processors and distributors (Wornick, Pinnacle, Kraft-Heinz, Perfetti, Grippo, Skidmore, Sysco, Sunny Delight). During my time in Cincinnati and due to my connection with the UC program, I was fortunate to have taught and worked with many budding culinary and food scientists, who have since moved on to build formidable careers in the food sciences. The proposed BS in culinary and food sciences program would help overcome a general paucity of food science professionals that currently exists nationwide, but particularly to fulfill needs in the Tri-state area. The program has the unique potential to vertically integrate a continuum of culinary and food science professionals with an area already replete with food industry opportunities. An advantage the Tristate area brings to a food science program is the availability of professionals in the field with work experience and a passion to teach. It is conceivable that over time, such a program could evolve in to one of the nation's top food science programs and begin to attract both out-of-state students and expertise. I strongly believe, its high time, Cincinnati serve as the one-stop location for a student to gain food science knowledge and contribute their skills back to the food industry. A B.S. in culinary and food sciences program at Cincinnati State is the first step in this direction.

Comment: 
I would like to express my support for the addition of the BS in Culinary and Food Science at Cincinnati State. I received my AAB from Cincinnati State in 2008 and was able to transfer that experience into the BS program at the University of Cincinnati through the Pathways program the schools had at the time. I graduated from UC in 2012, and my experience from both programs has been invaluable to me- Cincinnati State helped me build upon and expand my restaurant experience, and UC gave me a new career path to the technical/manufacturing/ R&D side of the food industry. I met my first employer for this career path through my co-op experience at UC and have had the privilege of working in different facets of the industry because of this experience. I am currently employed by one of the largest food ingredient companies in the world, and my experience gained through the UC Culinology program was key in helping me get this job and continue to grow in my work. I feel I made one of the best choices of my life when I decided to enter the Culinology program. This is a fast-growing industry with a need for this program in the Cincinnati area. I am fortunate to be where I am today because of my time and experience in this program. Thank you for taking the time to consider this petition. Kind Regards, Melissa Porter

Comment: 
YSU has significant concerns regarding this proposed program, especially around its applied nature and financial viability. Since the proposed program is intended to replace the program eliminated at UC, which had (by Cincinnati State count) roughly 12 graduates per year, and it appears that UC could not make a viable program, what makes us expect that the current program would have sufficient enrollment to be viable. Why should the state invest significant resources to establish a low enroll program that has already proven to be unsuccessful? The jobs that are indicated as competitive do not appear to be “applied”. Is this really an applied bachelor degree, or is it intended to be a replacement for the degree that UC eliminated. If so, why would this be successful when the UC program was not? The budget is based on 20 additional students for 4 years. But the added 2 year portion is the only portion to generate new revenue. And it is unlikely that revenue can be received from students on co-op assignments. Won’t the co-op also detract from the numbers enrolled in classes, making the program even more financially risky? How do the first two years of the proposed curriculum align with the existing two-year program? These applied Bachelor's degrees are expected to look like 2+2 programs to take advantage of existing capability. But without a more detailed curriculum, this aspect is hard to assess.