The Ohio Articulation & Transfer Policy: Appendices

Overview Policy Appendices Definitions Directives

Appendices

Appendix A: Legislation

 

1. INITIATION OF OHIO ARTICULATION AND TRANSFER POLICY

Am. Sub. S.B. No. 268, 118th General Assembly

SECTION 5.

The Ohio Board of Regents shall establish a study commission to make formal recommendations to the Governor and the 118th General Assembly regarding implementation of a statewide student credit-hour transfer agreement to address the articulation problems associated with students transferring from public technical and community colleges to public universities.  The recommendations of the study commission shall be submitted by the Board to the Governor, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and the President of the Senate no later than January 5, 1990.

 

Am. Sub. H.B. No. 111, 118th General Assembly

SECTION 91.09.         

(A) The Ohio Board of Regents shall establish policies:

(1) To facilitate the transfer of students and credits between community colleges and state community colleges, between community colleges and state universities, between community colleges and technical colleges, between community colleges and branch universities, between state community colleges and state universities, between state community colleges and technical colleges, between state community colleges and branch universities, between state universities and technical colleges, between state universities and branch universities, and between technical colleges and branch universities;

(2) To facilitate the transfer of students and credits from one community college to another, from one state community college to another, from one state university to another, from one technical college to another, and from one branch or university to another.

(B) In furtherance of the objectives of division (A) of this section, the policies adopted under this section shall encourage:

(1) The development of courses at community colleges, state community colleges, technical colleges, university branches and state universities that are equivalent to each other and are readily transferable;

(2) The establishment of uniform procedures for the transfer of students and credits among community colleges, state community colleges, state universities, technical colleges, and branch universities;

(3) The equitable treatment of transfer students and non-transfer students;

(4) The system-wide recognition of Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees from fully accredited community colleges and state community colleges;

(5) The development of consistent admissions policies of state universities and university branches for the transfer of students who hold Associate of Applied Business and Associate of Applied Science degrees from fully accredited community colleges, state community colleges, and technical colleges;

(6) The establishment of a state-level appeals process for a student to appeal an adverse evaluation of his coursework by an institution to which he is transferring.

(C) By January 1, 1990, the Board shall report to the General Assembly about the progress the Board has made in eliminating articulation problems between community colleges and state community colleges, between community colleges and state universities, between community colleges and technical colleges, between community colleges and branch universities, between state community colleges and state universities, between state community colleges and technical colleges, between state community colleges and branch universities, between state universities and technical colleges, between state universities and branch universities, between technical colleges and branch universities, from one community college to another, from one state community college to another, from one state university to another, from one technical college to another, and from one branch university to another, and shall propose a plan to the General Assembly for eliminating remaining articulation problems.

 

2. EXPANSION OF OHIO ARTICULATION AND TRANSFER POLICY

Ohio Revised Code Sections and Executive Orders

 

Am. Sub. H.B. No. 95, 125th General Assembly

Amended by 131st General Assembly, H.B. No. 64

3333.16 Universal course equivalency classification system for state institutions of higher education.

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/3333.16  

As used in this section "state institution of higher education" means an institution of higher education as defined in section 3345.12 of the Revised Code.

(A) The chancellor of higher education shall do all of the following:

(1) Establish policies and procedures applicable to all state institutions of higher education that ensure that students can begin higher education at any state institution of higher education and transfer coursework and degrees to any other state institution of higher education without unnecessary duplication or institutional barriers.  The purpose of this requirement is to allow students to attain their highest educational aspirations in the most efficient and effective manner for the students and the state.  These policies and procedures shall require state institutions of higher education to make changes or modifications, as needed, to strengthen course content so as to ensure equivalency for that course at any state institution of higher education.

(2) Develop and implement a universal course equivalency classification system for state institutions of higher education so that the transfer of students and the transfer and articulation of equivalent courses or specified learning modules or units completed by students are not inhibited by inconsistent judgment about the application of transfer credits.  Coursework completed within such a system at one state institution of higher education and transferred to another institution shall be applied to the student's degree objective in the same manner as equivalent coursework completed at the receiving institution.

(3) Develop a system of transfer policies that ensure that graduates with associate degrees which include completion of approved transfer modules shall be admitted to a state institution of higher education, shall be able to compete for admission to specific programs on the same basis as students native to the institution, and shall have priority over out-of-state associate degree graduates and transfer students. To assist a student in advising and transferring, all state institutions of higher education shall fully implement the course applicability system.

(4) Examine the feasibility of developing a transfer marketing agenda that includes materials and interactive technology to inform the citizens of Ohio about the availability of transfer options at state institutions of higher education and to encourage adults to return to colleges and universities for additional education.

(5) Study, in consultation with the state board of career colleges and schools, and in light of existing criteria and any other criteria developed by the articulation and transfer advisory council, the feasibility of credit recognition and transferability to state institutions of higher education for graduates who have received associate degrees from a career college or school with a certificate of registration from the state board of career colleges and schools under Chapter 3332.03 of the Revised Code.

(B) Sectional provisions of the existing articulation and transfer policy developed by the chancellor shall remain in effect except where amended by this section.

(C) Not later than December 1, 2018, the chancellor shall update and implement the policies and procedures established pursuant to this section to ensure that any associate degree offered at a state institution of higher education may be transferred and applied to a bachelor degree program in an equivalent field at any other state institution of higher education without unnecessary duplication or institutional barriers.  The policies and procedures shall ensure that each transferred associate degree applies to the student’s degree objective in the same manner as equivalent coursework completed by the student at the receiving institution.

When updating and implementing the policies and procedures pursuant to this division, the chancellor shall seek input from faculty and academic leaders in each academic field or discipline.

 

Am. Sub. S.B. No. 2, 125th General Assembly

Amended by 131st General Assembly, H.B. No. 64

3333.161 - Statewide system for articulation agreements among state institutions of higher education for transfer students pursuing teacher education programs.

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/3333.161

(A) As used in this section:

(1) "Articulation agreement" means an agreement between two or more state institutions of higher education to facilitate the transfer of students and credits between such institutions.

(2) "State institution of higher education" and "state university" have the same meanings as in section 3345.011 of the Revised Code.

(3) "Two year college" includes a community college, state community college, technical college, and university branch.

(B) The chancellor of higher education shall adopt rules establishing a statewide system for articulation agreements among state institutions of higher education for transfer students pursuing teacher education programs. The rules shall require an articulation agreement between institutions to include all of the following:

(1) The development of a transfer module for teacher education that includes introductory level courses that are evaluated as appropriate by faculty employed by the state institutions of higher education that are parties to the articulation agreement;

(2) A foundation of general studies courses that have been identified as part of the transfer module for teacher education and have been evaluated as appropriate for the preparation of teachers and consistent with the academic content standards adopted under section 3301.079 of the Revised Code;

(3) A clear identification of university faculty who are partnered with two year college faculty;

(4) The publication of the articulation agreement that is available to all students, faculty, and staff.

 

Am. Sub. H.B. No. 66, 126th General Assembly

Amended by 131st General Assembly, H.B. No. 64

3333.162 - Criteria, policies, and procedures for transfer of technical courses completed through a career-technical education institution.

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/3333.162  

(A) As used in this section, "state institution of higher education" means an institution of higher education as defined in section 3345.12 of the Revised Code.

(B) By April 15, 2007, the chancellor of higher education, in consultation with the department of education, public adult and secondary career-technical education institutions, and state institutions of higher education, shall establish criteria, policies, and procedures that enable students to transfer agreed upon technical courses completed through an adult career-technical education institution, a public secondary career-technical institution, or a state institution of higher education to a state institution of higher education without unnecessary duplication or institutional barriers. The courses to which the criteria, policies, and procedures apply shall be those that adhere to recognized industry standards and equivalent coursework common to the secondary career pathway and adult career-technical education system and regionally accredited state institutions of higher education. Where applicable, the policies and procedures shall build upon the articulation agreement and transfer initiative course equivalency system required by section 3333.16 of the Revised Code.

 

Am. Sub. S.B. No. 311, 126th General Assembly

Amended by 131st General Assembly, H.B. No. 64

3333.163 - Standards for college credit based on advanced placement test scores. 

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/3333.163  

(A) As used in this section, "state institution of higher education" has the same meaning as in section 3345.011 of the Revised Code.

(B) Not later than April 15, 2008, the articulation and transfer advisory council of the chancellor of higher education shall recommend to the chancellor standards for awarding course credit toward degree requirements at state institutions of higher education based on scores attained on advanced placement examinations. The recommended standards shall include a score on each advanced placement examination that the council considers to be a passing score for which course credit may be awarded. Upon adoption of the standards by the chancellor, each state institution of higher education shall comply with the standards in awarding course credit to any student enrolled in the institution who has attained a passing score on an advanced placement examination.

 

Executive Order 2013-05K - In June of 2013, Governor John R. Kasich signed Executive Order 2013-05K to support Ohio’s veterans by streamlining the processes for licensing and certification and for awarding of college credit for military training, experience, and coursework. The order required the Chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education to investigate the current practices of awarding college credit for military training, experience, and coursework by public institutions of higher education in Ohio.

http://www.governor.ohio.gov/Portals/0/Executive%20Order%202013-05K.pdf

 

Am. Sub. H.B. No. 488, 130th General Assembly

Amended by 131st General Assembly, H.B. No. 64

3333.164 - Establishment of baseline standards and procedures for public institutions of higher education to use in the granting of college credit for military training, experience, and coursework.

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/3333.164  

(A) As used in this section, "state institution of higher education" has the same meaning as in section 3345.011 of the Revised Code.

(B) Not later than December 31, 2014, the chancellor of higher education shall do all of the following with regard to the awarding of college credit for military training, experience, and coursework:

(1) Develop a set of standards and procedures for state institutions of higher education to utilize in the granting of college credit for military training, experience, and coursework;

(2) Create a military articulation and transfer assurance guide for college credit that is earned through military training, experience, and coursework. The chancellor shall use the current articulation and transfer policy adopted pursuant to section 3333.16 of the Revised Code as a model in developing this guide.

(3) Create a web site that contains information related to the awarding of college credit for military training, experience, and coursework. The web site shall include both of the following:

(a) Standardized resources that address frequently asked questions regarding the awarding of such credit and related issues;

(b) A statewide database that shows how specified military training, experience, and coursework translates to college credit.

(4) Develop a statewide training program that prepares faculty and staff of state institutions of higher education to evaluate various military training, experience, and coursework and to award appropriate equivalent credit. The training program shall incorporate the best practices of awarding credit for military experiences, including both the recommendations of the American council on education and the standards developed by the council for adult and experiential learning.

(C) Beginning on July 1, 2015, state institutions of higher education shall ensure that appropriate equivalent credit is awarded for military training, experience, and coursework that meet the standards developed by the chancellor pursuant to this section.

 

Am. Sub. H.B. No. 488, 130th General Assembly

3345.42 - Definitions for service member and veteran.

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/3345.42

As used in sections 3345.421, 3345.422, 3345.423, and 3345.424 of the Revised Code:

"Service member" means a person who is serving in the armed forces of the United States.

"Veteran" means any person who has completed service in the armed forces, including the national guard of any state or a reserve component of the armed forces, and who has been discharged under honorable conditions from the armed forces or who has been transferred to the reserve with evidence of satisfactory service.

 

Am. Sub. H.B. No. 488, 130th General Assembly

Amended by 131st General Assembly, H.B. No. 64

3345.421 - Assistance and support to veterans and service members by institutions of higher education.

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/3345.421  

Not later than December 31, 2014, the board of trustees of each state institution of higher education, as defined in section 3345.011 of the Revised Code, shall do all of the following:

(A) Designate at least one person employed by the institution to serve as the contact person for veterans and service member affairs. Such a person shall assist and advise veterans and service members on issues related to earning college credit for military training, experience, and coursework.

(B) Adopt a policy regarding the support and assistance the institution will provide to veterans and service members.

(C) Allow for the establishment of a student-led group on campus for student service members and veterans and encourage other service member- and veteran-friendly organizations.

(D) Integrate existing career services to create and encourage meaningful collaborative relationships between student service members and veterans and alumni of the institution, that links student service members and veterans with prospective employers, and that provides student service members and veterans with social opportunities; and, if the institution has career services programs, encourage the responsible office to seek and promote partnership opportunities for internships and employment of student service members and veterans with state, local, national, and international employers.

(E) Survey student service members and veterans to identify their needs and challenges and make the survey available to faculty and staff at the state institution of higher education. And periodically conduct follow-up surveys, at a frequency determined by the board, to gauge the institution's progress toward meeting identified needs and challenges.

The chancellor of higher education shall provide guidance to state institutions of higher education in their compliance with this section, including the recommendation of standardized policies on support and assistance to veterans and service members.

The person or persons designated under division (A) of this section shall not be a person currently designated by the institution as a veterans administration certifying official.

 

Am. Sub. H.B. No. 488, 130th General Assembly

3345.423 - Appeals process for resolution of disputes over credit for military experience.

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/Search/3345.423

Not later than December 31, 2014, the board of trustees or managing authority of each state institution of higher education, as defined in section 3345.011 of the Revised Code, shall establish an appeals procedure for students who are veterans or service members for resolving disputes regarding the awarding of college credit for military experience.

 

Am. Sub. H. B. No. 59, 130th General Assembly; Section 363.120; Ohio's FY 2014-2015 biennium budget; appropriation item 235444

Not later than June 30, 2014, the Chancellor of the Department of Higher Education shall establish a One-Year Option credit articulation system in which graduates of Ohio Technical Centers who complete a 900-hour program of study and obtain an industry-recognized credential approved by the Chancellor shall receive 30 college technical credit hours toward a technical degree upon enrollment in an institution of higher education. Reference link: Legislation

 

H.B. No. 64, 131th General Assembly

3333.165 – Requires the Chancellor to submit an annual report of specified transfer statistics.

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/3333.165

  1. At the end of each academic year, the chancellor of higher education shall develop and release a report that includes all of the following information:

(1) The total number of courses that were successfully transferred to state institutions of higher education under sections 3333.16 to 3333.164 of the Revised Code, during the most recent academic year for which data is available;

(2) The total number of courses that were not accepted for transfer at state institutions of higher education under sections 3333.16 to 3333.164 of the Revised Code, during the most recent academic year for which data is available;

(3) The number of students who earned an associate degree at a community college, a state community college, or a university branch that was successfully transferred to a state university under sections 3333.16 to 3333.164 of the Revised Code.

(B) As used in this section, "state institution of higher education" and "state university" have the same meanings as in section 3345.011 of the Revised Code.

 

H.B. No. 64, 131th General Assembly

3345.38 - Requires awarding undergraduate course credit for completion of the international baccalaureate diploma.

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/3345.38

(A) The board of trustees of each state institution of higher education shall adopt and implement a policy to grant undergraduate course credit to a student who has successfully completed an international baccalaureate diploma program.

(B) The policy adopted by each institution under this section shall do all of the following:

(1) Establish conditions for granting course credit, including the minimum scores required on examinations constituting the international baccalaureate diploma program in order to receive credit;

(2) Identify specific course credit or other academic requirements of the institution, including the number of credit hours or other course credit that the institution will grant to a student who completes the diploma program.

(C) As used in this section:

(1) "State institution of higher education" has the same meaning as in section 3345.011 of the Revised Code.

(2) "International baccalaureate diploma program" means the curriculum and examinations leading to an international baccalaureate diploma awarded by the international baccalaureate organization.

 

Appendix B: Commission on Articulation and Transfer Guiding Objectives

The Chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education appointed a 21-member Commission representative of public colleges and universities to work with the Chancellor’s staff to address the critical issues that limit credit transfer. The Commission’s draft action recommendations, contained in “The Ohio Articulation and Transfer Policy” which was adopted in November 1990, were grounded in three Guiding Objectives:

  1. Transfer and native students should be assured equitable consideration and treatment by each college and university.
  2. Students who began their collegiate studies at a community college or university regional campus should be encouraged to complete an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree before transferring to a baccalaureate institution.
  3. Institutional autonomy and integrity for the General Education program at each college and university should be assured.

Appendix C: Defining the 70% Standard in Transfer Assurance Guide (TAG) Learning Outcomes

As a standard, the Articulation and Transfer Advisory Council established the benchmark of 70% commonality for the learning outcomes listed for each major course in each Transfer Assurance Guide. Seventy percent commonality is determined in the following manner: The sending institution’s course(s) must meet or exceed 70% of the content for the learning outcomes identified for each TAG course. Course(s) would then transfer and apply toward the degree at the receiving institution in the same manner as the equivalent course taken by a native student in the same program.

The learning outcomes are not intended to reflect minimum expectations. The learning outcomes reflect the content necessary to ensure students have the knowledge and skill to be successful in subsequent courses and guarantee the comparability of courses across institutions. 

There are some exceptions to the 70% standard:

  1. Certain learning outcomes have been designated as “essential” by the faculty panel responsible for drafting a particular TAG. These essential learning outcomes must be included in the framework of the sending institution’s course. Otherwise, it is not considered equivalent and is not guaranteed to apply.
  2. Courses which have a limited number of learning outcomes (three or fewer) must include all those listed in order to be considered equivalent and included in that institution’s TAG.
  3. Accreditation, regulatory and/or licensing bodies mandate that all outcomes be taught. Within the Education-Professional Education Module, for example, 100% of the identified learning outcomes must be taught. Additional outcomes may be included, but none listed can be deleted in order to ensure that all students are consistently prepared according to accreditation and/or licensing standards.

 

Review of the TAGs

It is important to note that transfer students are expected to meet any institutional degree requirements required of a native student. These may include, but are not limited to:  minimum grade-point average, residency requirements, minimum grades in specific courses, performance requirements (e.g., dance, music), and other requirements of native students from the same institutions. 

Beginning in the Fall of 2005, expanded faculty subcommittees have been reviewing courses submitted by the various campuses in each of the TAGs. These faculty subcommittees review the course outcomes provided by the sending institution and determine if the course(s) meet(s) the 70% standard. 

 

Policy approved by the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Advisory Council – January 5, 2006.

Appendix D: Directive for the Establishment of the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network

Appendix E: Transfer of Courses with a Passing Grade Policy

As of Fall 2005, Ohio public institutions of higher education are to accept and apply all transfer coursework with a letter grade of D or higher as the institution would for a native student under the business rules and academic policies of the receiving institution. These business rules and policies may include, but are not limited to, such areas as effective course dates, age of coursework, requirements of a particular major or program, and eligibility.

Points of Clarification:

  1. This policy was adopted to ensure the equitable treatment of transfer students with native students across Ohio's public institutions of higher education.
  2. Public colleges and universities which offer D as the lowest passing grade are required to accept all college-level courses with a grade of D or higher.  Institutions which offer D- (minus) as the lowest passing grade are required to accept all college-level courses with a grade of D- or higher. It should be noted that this point applies to other clarifications below that refer to grades of D/D- (minus).
  3. Public colleges and universities shall establish policies which honor the acceptance and award of transfer credit for D/D- graded courses completed in or after Autumn 2005. Institutions may choose to be more lenient in the application of this policy and accept D/ D- (minus) graded courses completed prior to Autumn 2005 (See also clarification 2).
  4. While public institutions are required by this policy to accept D/D- (minus) graded courses only from other Ohio public colleges and universities, they have the option to extend their policy to accept such coursework from other regionally accredited institutions.
  5. To provide equitable treatment, the requirements to accept courses graded D/D- shall apply equally to transfer students and to continuing students who completed coursework elsewhere in or after Autumn 2005 (e.g., a continuing student at university X who takes a course at college Y, while away on an internship/vacation, would be eligible to transfer that work back to university X if he/she earned a grade of D/D- [minus] or higher in the course) (See also clarification 2).
  6. The 1990 Ohio Articulation and Transfer Policy section which requires the acceptance of all college-level courses that students have passed (D/D- [minus] remains in effect for all students with an earned Associate of Arts (AA)/Associate of Science (AS) degree) (See also clarification 2).
  7. The 1990 Ohio Articulation and Transfer Policy section required that individual courses completed subsequent to the award of an AA/AS degree needed to have a grade of C or higher to be accepted and awarded credit. This portion of the policy has been modified to be consistent with the acceptance of credit at the D/D- (minus) level or higher when completed in or after Autumn 2005 (See also clarification 2).
  8. The 1990 Ohio Articulation and Transfer Policy required that students without an AA/AS degree needed to have a C or higher in each class used to complete their Ohio Transfer Module. This portion of the policy has been modified to require a D/D- (minus) or better grade for courses completed in or after Autumn 2005 (See also clarification 2).
  9. This policy does not override institutional admission standards and/or requirements of entrance into a specific academic program (For example, should a receiving institution require native students to earn a grade of C or higher for a specific course in a major, transfer students must meet the same requirement. The D/D- [minus] course would be accepted for transfer credit, but it would not be applied to the specific course in the major) (See also clarification 2).
  10. Consistent with the spirit of the policy and clarification 2, there is no universal minimum grade or quality points for the acceptance of credit, and thresholds for this are set by institutional grading policy at the D or D- (minus) level.

 

Policy approved by the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Advisory Council - February 17, 2005

Further clarifications provided by the Oversight Committee of the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Advisory Council - May 27, 2005 and December 8, 2005

Appendix F: Catalog Statement

Institutional Transfer

The Ohio Department of Higher Education in 1990, following a directive of the 118th Ohio General Assembly, developed the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Policy to facilitate students' ability to transfer credits from one Ohio public college or university to another in order to avoid duplication of course requirements. A subsequent policy review and recommendations produced by the Articulation and Transfer Advisory Council in 2004, together with mandates from the 125th Ohio General Assembly in the form of Amended Substitute House Bill 95, have prompted improvements of the original policy. Additional legislation from the 125th Ohio General Assembly also initiated the development of a statewide system for articulation agreements among state institutions of higher education for transfer students pursuing teacher education programs.

Action by the 126th Ohio General Assembly led to the establishment of criteria, policies, and procedures for the transfer of technical courses completed through a career-technical education institution; and standards for the awarding of college credit based on Advanced Placement (AP) test scores.

Legislation from the 130th Ohio General Assembly required public institutions of higher education to: use baseline standards and procedures in the granting of college credit for military training, experience, and coursework; establish an appeals process for resolving disputes over the awarding of credit for military experience; provide specific assistance and support to veterans and service members; adopt a common definition of a service member and veteran; and establish a credit articulation system in which adult graduates of public career-technical institutions who complete a 900 clock-hour program of study and obtain an industry-recognized credential approved by the Chancellor shall receive 30 college technical credit hours toward a technical degree upon enrollment.

While all public colleges and universities are required to follow the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Policy, independent colleges and universities in Ohio may or may not participate in the Transfer Policy.  Therefore, students interested in transferring to independent institutions are encouraged to check with the college or university of their choice regarding transfer agreements. In support of improved articulation and transfer processes, the Ohio Department of Higher Education has established an articulation and transfer clearinghouse to receive, annotate, and convey transcripts among public colleges and universities. This system is designed to provide standardized information and help colleges and universities reduce undesirable variability in the transfer credit evaluation process.

 

Acceptance of Transfer and Articulated Credit

To recognize courses appropriately and provide equity in the treatment of incoming transfer students and students native to the receiving institution, transfer credit will be accepted for all successfully completed college-level courses completed in or after Fall 2005 from Ohio public institutions of higher education. Students who successfully completed Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degrees prior to Fall 2005 with a 2.0 or better overall grade-point average would also receive credit for all college-level courses they have passed. While this reflects the baseline policy requirement, individual institutions may set equitable institutional policies that are more accepting.

Pass/Fail courses, credit-by-examination credits, experiential learning courses, and other non-traditional credit courses that meet these conditions will also be accepted and posted to the student record.

 

Application of Transfer and Articulated Credit

Application of credit is the decision process performed by the receiving institution to determine how the credits it has accepted and recorded on the student's official academic transcript will or will not apply toward program and degree requirements. While the receiving institution makes this decision, it will do so within the parameters of this Policy.

The following guidelines and requirements shall govern the application of transfer and articulated credit:

 

Ohio Transfer Module

The Ohio Department of Higher Education’s Articulation and Transfer Policy established the Ohio Transfer Module, which may be a subset or the entire set of a public higher education institution’s general education curriculum in Associate of Arts (AA), Associate of Science (AS) and baccalaureate degree programs. Students in applied associate degree programs may complete some individual Ohio Transfer Module courses within their degree program or continue beyond the degree program to complete the entire Transfer Module. The Ohio Transfer Module contains 36-40 semester or 54-60 quarter hours of course credit in English composition (minimum of 3 semester or 5 quarter hours); mathematics, statistics and logic (minimum of 3 semester or 3 quarter hours); arts and humanities (minimum of 6 semester or 9 quarter hours); social and behavioral sciences (minimum of 6 semester or 9 quarter hours); and natural sciences (minimum of 6 semester or 9 quarter hours). Oral communication and interdisciplinary areas may be included as additional options.  Additional elective hours from among these areas make up the total hours for a completed Ohio Transfer Module.  Courses for the Ohio Transfer Module should be 100- and 200-level general education courses commonly completed in the first two years of a student’s course of study. Each public university and technical and community college is required to establish and maintain an approved Ohio Transfer Module.

Ohio Transfer Module course(s) or the full module completed at one college or university will automatically meet the requirements of individual Ohio Transfer Module course(s) or the full Ohio Transfer Module at another college or university once the student is admitted.  Students may be required, however, to meet additional general education requirements at the institution to which they transfer. For example, a student who completes the Ohio Transfer Module at Institution S (sending institution) and then transfers to Institution R (receiving institution) is said to have completed the Ohio Transfer Module portion of Institution R's general education program. Institution R, however, may have general education courses that go beyond its Ohio Transfer Module. State policy initially required that all courses in the Ohio Transfer Module be completed to receive its benefit in transfer. However, subsequent policy revisions have extended this benefit to the completion of individual Ohio Transfer Module courses on a course-by-course basis.

 

Transfer Assurance Guides

Transfer Assurance Guides (TAGs) comprise Ohio Transfer Module courses and additional courses required for an academic major called TAG courses. A TAG is an advising tool to assist Ohio university and community and technical college students in planning for specific majors and making course selections that will ensure comparable, compatible, and equivalent learning experiences across Ohio’s public higher education system. A number of area-specific TAG pathways in meta-majors including the arts, humanities, business, communication, education, health, mathematics, sciences, engineering, engineering technologies, social sciences, and foreign languages have been developed by faculty teams.   

TAGs empower students to make informed course selection decisions and plans for their future transfer. Advisors at the institution to which a student wishes to transfer should also be consulted during the transfer process. Students may elect to complete the full TAG or any subset of courses from the TAG. Because of specific major requirements, early identification of a student's intended major is encouraged.  

 

Career-Technical Assurance Guides

Collaboration among the Ohio Department of Higher Education, the Ohio Department of Education, and other key stakeholders led to the development of policies and procedures to create statewide career-technical discipline specific articulation agreements and further ensure that students completing coursework at an adult or secondary career-technical institution can articulate and transfer agreed-upon technical courses/programs to any Ohio public institution of higher education and among Ohio public institutions of higher education "without unnecessary duplication or institutional barriers."  

Career-Technical Assurance Guides (CTAGs) are statewide articulation agreements that guarantee the recognition of learning which occurs at public adult and secondary career-technical institutions and have the opportunity for the award of college credit toward technical courses/programs at any public higher education institution. CTAGs serve as advising tools, identifying the statewide content guarantee and describing other conditions or obligations (e.g., program accreditation or industry credential) associated with the guarantee.

 

Military Transfer Assurance Guides

In response to the legislative requirement (Ohio Revised Code 3333.164) to create a military articulation and transfer assurance guide for college-level learning that took place through military training, experience, and coursework, college credit will be granted to students with military training, experience, and/or coursework that is recognized by the American Council on Education (ACE) or a regionally accredited military institution, such as Community College of the Air Force

In order to streamline the awarding, transferability, and applicability of college credit, service members and veterans are guaranteed to earn certain types of credit(s) or course(s) as specified in the Military Transfer Assurance Guides (MTAGs), which are based on the endorsed baseline standards and procedures by the Chancellor. Equivalent course(s), credits for courses, or block of credit is to be awarded and applied towards general education and/or major course requirements at the receiving institution in accordance with the MTAG guarantee. There is some training, experience, and coursework that the receiving institution may be able to award college credit only toward general or free electives.

In addition, public institutions of higher education shall ensure that appropriate equivalent credit is awarded for military training, experience, and coursework that meet the baseline standards and procedures according to the Ohio Revised Code 3333.164. This requirement goes beyond credit/course awarded based on the MTAG alignment process.

 

Apprenticeship Pathway Programs

The Apprenticeship Pathways initiative advocates for individuals completing apprenticeships by incorporating their learning into academic credit, thereby saving them time and money and encouraging them to advance their academic credentials to contribute to a strong, educated workforce.

Ohio apprenticeship programs partner with public two-year institutions to provide technology-specific statewide articulation agreements that recognize non-traditional prior learning. College credit is awarded toward a technical associate degree. Each agreement simplifies student advising by outlining how apprenticeship training in a certain pathway applies to an applied associate degree and lists remaining courses required to complete the degree. The application of the credit toward a technical associate degree in these agreements is guaranteed at the participating receiving institutions.

 

Advanced Placement (AP) Exams

The State of Ohio, working with public institutions of higher education, has initiated policies to facilitate the ease of transition from high school to college, as well as between and among Ohio’s public colleges and universities.

Beginning in the Fall term 2009:

  1. Students obtaining an Advanced Placement (AP) exam score of 3 or above will be awarded the aligned course(s) and credits for the AP exam area(s) successfully completed.
  2. General Education courses and credits received will be applied towards graduation and will satisfy a general education requirement if the course(s) to which the AP area is equivalent fulfill(s) a requirement.
  3. If an equivalent course is not available for the AP exam area completed, elective or area credit will be awarded in the appropriate academic discipline and will be applied towards graduation where such elective credit options exist within the academic major.
  4. Additional courses or credits may be available when a score of 4 or 5 is obtained. Award of credit for higher score values varies depending on the institution and academic discipline.

In academic disciplines containing highly dependent sequences (Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics – STEM) students are strongly advised to confer with the college/university advising staff to ensure they have the appropriate foundation to be successful in advanced coursework within the sequence.

 

One-Year Option Credit Award

The One-Year Option builds upon Ohio’s articulation and transfer system to help more adults accelerate their preparation for work by earning a technical associate degree. Consistent with the philosophy of the Career-Technical Assurance Guides (CTAGs), the One-Year Option guarantees that college credit will be awarded for college-level learning that occurs through adult programs at public career-technical institutions.

Adults who complete a career-technical education program of study consisting of a minimum of 900 clock-hours and achieve an industry-recognized credential approved by the Chancellor shall receive thirty (30) semester hours of technical course credit toward a standardized Associate of Technical Study Degree (ATS) upon matriculation at a public institution of higher education that confers such a degree. The 30 semester hours will be awarded as a block of credit rather than credit for specific courses. Proportional credit is to be awarded toward the ATS degree for adults who complete a program of study between 600 and 899 clock hours and achieved an industry-recognized credential approved by the Chancellor.  

The credit earned through the One-Year Option will be applied to ATS degrees bearing the following standardized degree titles:

  1. Associate of Technical Study in Building and Industrial Technology
  2. Associate of Technical Study in Business Technology
  3. Associate of Technical Study in Health and Allied Health Technology
  4. Associate of Technical Study in Information Technology
  5. Associate of Technical Study in Services Technology

 

Conditions for Transfer Admission

  1. Graduates who are considered transfer students under the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) definition with associate degrees from  Ohio’s public institutions of higher education and a completed, approved Ohio Transfer Module shall be admitted to a public institution of higher education in Ohio, provided their cumulative grade-point average is at least 2.0 for all previous college-level courses and and other institutional admission criteria, such as space availability, adherence to deadlines, payment of fees, and grade-point average that are fairly and equally applied to all undergraduate students, have also been satisfied. Further, these students shall have admission priority over graduates with an out-of-state associate degree and other transfer students with transferable and/or articulated college credit.
  2. Associate degree holders who are considered transfer students under the IPEDS definition and have not completed the Ohio Transfer Module from an Ohio public institution of higher education will be eligible for preferential consideration for admission as transfer students as long as the institution’s admission criteria, such as the minimum academic standards, space availability, adherence to deadlines, and payment of fees, are fairly and equally applied to all undergraduate students.
  3. In order to encourage completion of the baccalaureate degree, students who are not enrolled in or who have not earned an degree but have earned 60 semester/90 quarter hours or more of credit toward a baccalaureate degree with a cumulative grade-point average of at least a 2.0 for all previous college-level courses will be eligible for preferential consideration for admission as transfer studentsas long as the institution’s admission criteria, such as the minimum academic standards, space availability, adherence to deadlines, and payment of fees, are fairly and equally applied to all undergraduate students.
  4. Students who have not earned an associate degree or who have not earned 60 semester/90 quarter hours of credit with a grade-point average of at least a 2.0 for all previous college-level courses will be eligible for admission as transfer students on a competitive basis.
  5. Incoming transfer students admitted to a college or university shall compete for admission to selective programs, majors, and units on an equal basis with students native to the receiving institution.

The admission of transfer students by an institution, however, does not guarantee admission to any majors, minors, or fields of concentration at the institution. Some programs have additional academic and non-academic requirements beyond those for general admission to the institution (e.g., background check, a grade-point average higher than a 2.0, or a grade-point average higher than the average required for admission to the institution). Once admitted, transfer students shall be subject to the same regulations governing applicability of catalog requirements as native students. Furthermore, transfer students shall be accorded the same class standing and other privileges as native students on the basis of the number of credits earned. All residency requirements must be completed at the receiving institution.

 

Responsibilities of Students

To maximize transfer credit application, prospective transfer students must take responsibility for planning their course of study to meet both the academic and non-academic requirements of the institution to which they desire to articulate or transfer credit as early as possible. The student is responsible to investigate and use the information, advising, and other available resources to develop such a plan. Students should actively seek program, degree, and transfer information; meet with an advisor from both the current and receiving institutions to assist them in preparing a course of study that meets the academic requirements for the program/degree to which they plan to transfer; use the various electronic course/program transfer and applicability database systems, including  Ohio Transfer to Degree Guarantee web resources; and select courses/programs at their current institution that satisfy requirements at the receiving institution to maximize the application of transfer credit. Specifically, students should identify early in their collegiate studies an institution and major to which they desire to transfer. Furthermore, students should determine if there are foreign language requirements or any special course requirements that can be met during the freshman or sophomore year. This will enable students to plan and pursue a course of study that will better articulate with the receiving institution's major.

 

Appeals Process

Following the evaluation of a student transcript from another institution, the receiving college institution will provide the student with a Statement of Transfer and Articulated Credit Applicability (Degree Audit Report). A student disagreeing with the application of transfer and/or articulated credit by the receiving institution must file his/her appeal in writing within ninety (90) days of receipt of the Statement of Transfer and Articulated Credit Applicability. The institution shall respond to the appeal within thirty (30) days of the receipt of the appeal at each appeal level.

 

Student Complaints Following Transfer Appeals at the Receiving Institution

After a student exhausts the appeals process at the receiving institution and chooses to pursue further action, the Ohio Department of Higher Education (ODHE) responds to formal written complaints related to Ohio Articulation and Transfer Policy against public, independent non-profit, and proprietary institutions of higher education in Ohio. While the ODHE has limited authority over colleges and universities and cannot offer legal advice or initiate civil court cases, staff will review written complaints submitted through its established process and work with student complainants and institutions.

Appendix G: Regional Accrediting Agencies for Higher Education Institutions

REGIONAL ACCREDITING AGENCIES FOR HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

The following regional and national accrediting agencies are recognized by the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education as reliable authorities concerning the quality of education or training offered by the institutions of higher education or higher education programs they accredit.

Unless otherwise noted in a Title IV note after the agency’s name, accreditation by an agency listed below may be used by an institution accredited by the agency to establish eligibility to participate in Title IV programs. Since December 1999, the Department has been routinely including distance education (defined at the time to include correspondence education) in its in-depth review of all agencies seeking initial or continued recognition. Consequently, all recognition decisions made after December 1, 1999 and prior to July 2010 include a determination as to whether an agency’s scope of recognition includes the accreditation of distance education.

 

Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) (doing business as Mid-Atlantic Region Commission on Higher Education)

Scope of recognition: the accreditation and preaccreditation ("Candidacy status") of institutions of higher education in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, including distance and correspondence education programs offered at those institutions.

Tel. (267) 284-5000, Fax (215) 662-5501
E-mail address: info@msche.org
Web address: www.msche.org

 

New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Commission on Institutions of Higher Education (CIHE)

Scope of recognition: the accreditation and preaccreditation ("Candidacy status") of institutions of higher education in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont that award bachelor’s, master’s, and/or doctoral degrees and associate degree-granting institutions in those states that include degrees in liberal arts or general studies among their offerings, including the accreditation of programs offered via distance education within these institutions.

Tel. (781) 425-7700, Fax (781) 425-1001
E-mail address: cihe@neasc.org

Web address: https://cihe.neasc.org

 

Higher Learning Commission (HLC)

Scope of recognition: the accreditation and preaccreditation ("Candidate for Accreditation") of degree-granting institutions of higher education in Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, including the tribal institutions and the accreditation of programs offered via distance education and correspondence education within these institutions. This recognition extends to the Institutional Actions Council jointly with the Board of Trustees of the Commission for decisions on cases for continued accreditation or reaffirmation, and continued candidacy, and to the Appeals Body jointly with the Board of Trustees of the Commission for decisions related to initial candidacy or accreditation or reaffirmation of accreditation.

Tel. (312) 263-0456, (800) 621-7440, Fax (312) 263-7462
E-mail address: inquiry@hlcommission.org
Web address: www.hlcommission.org  

 

Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities  (NWCCU)

Scope of recognition: the accreditation and preaccreditation (“Candidacy status”) of postsecondary degree-granting educational institutions in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington and the accreditation of programs offered via distance education within these institutions.

Tel. (425) 558-4224, Fax (425) 376-0596

Web address: www.nwccu.org

 

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) Commission on Colleges

Scope of recognition: the accreditation and preaccreditation (“Candidate for Accreditation”) of degree-granting institutions of higher education in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia, including the accreditation of programs offered via distance and correspondence education within these institutions. This recognition extends to the SACSCOC Board of Trustees and the Appeals Committee of the College Delegate Assembly on cases of initial candidacy or initial accreditation and for continued accreditation or candidacy.

Tel. (404) 679-4512, Fax (404) 994-6592
E-mail address: mailto:questions@sacscoc.org
Web address: www.sacscoc.org

 

Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, Western Association of Schools and Colleges (ACCJC-WASC)

Scope of recognition: the accreditation and preaccreditation ("Candidate for Accreditation") of community and other colleges with a primarily pre-baccalaureate mission located in California, Hawaii, the United States territories of Guam and American Samoa, the Republic of Palau, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The institutions offer certificates, associate degrees, and the first baccalaureate degree by means of a substantive change review offered by institutions that are already accredited by the agency, and such programs offered via distance education and correspondence education at these colleges. This recognition also extends to the Committee on Substantive Change of the Commission, for decisions on substantive changes, and the Appeals Panel.

Tel. (415) 506-0234, Fax (415) 506-0238
E-mail address: accjc@accjc.org
Web address: www.accjc.org

 

Western Association of Schools and Colleges, The Senior Colleges and University Commission

Scope of recognition: the accreditation and preaccreditation ("Candidate for Accreditation") of senior colleges and universities in California, Hawaii, the United States territories of Guam and American Samoa, the Republic of Palau, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and the Republic of the Marshall Islands, including distance education programs offered at those institutions.

Tel. (510) 748-9001, Fax (510) 748-9797
E-mail address: wasc@wascsenior.org
Web address: www.wascsenior.org

Appendix H: Directive for the Bilateral Articulation Agreements with Secondary Career-Technical Institutions: Principles and Guidelines

Appendix I: Ohio Transfer Module Guidelines and Learning Outcomes

The intent of the Ohio Transfer Module (OTM) is to help students acquire foundational learning experiences that will assure their ability to achieve success in upper-division coursework and live as productive citizens. The OTM may be a subset or the complete set of an institution's general education requirements. General education is defined as: “the set of courses and experiences that provide students with a broad exposure to multiple disciplines within the arts and sciences with the aim of providing students with the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in the 21st century.” In Ohio, the general education curriculum includes coursework in oral and written communication, mathematics and data analysis, arts and humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences.[1]

The OTM contains 36-40 semester or 54-60 quarter hours of course credit with a minimum of 24 semester or 36 quarter hours across all five areas: English composition (minimum of 3 semester or 5 quarter hours); mathematics, statistics, and logic (minimum of 3 semester or 3 quarter hours); arts and humanities (minimum of 6 semester or 9 quarter hours); social and behavioral sciences (minimum of 6 semester or 9 quarter hours); and natural sciences (minimum of 6 semester or 9 quarter hours). Oral communication and interdisciplinary areas may be included as additional options. Additional elective hours from among these areas make up the total hours for a completed OTM. Courses for the OTM are lower-division general education courses that provide, among other things, a basic understanding of the modes of inquiry common to the disciplines within each area.

Therefore, the Ohio Transfer Module is closely aligned with general education programs at public institutions of higher education. The OTM respects the unique visions for General Education within and among institutions. Although the specific character of each institution's general education program conveys something distinctive, all of the programs share some general principles in common: They are all designed to provide students not only with a breadth of knowledge, but also to develop foundational skills and abilities to succeed in the 21st century[2], including:

  • Knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world;
  • Intellectual and practical skills, including inquiry and analysis, critical and creative thinking, oral and written communication, quantitative literacy, in­formation literacy, teamwork, and problem solving; and
  • Personal and social responsibility, including civic knowledge and engage­ment, intercultural knowledge and competence, ethical reasoning and action, and foundations and skills for lifelong learning.

These general learning goals are directly connected to advanced study in a major. No field of study exists in isolation. The breadth of knowledge provided in general education curricula provides necessary context and support for advanced study in a major. Similarly, the skills and abilities are directly used in all majors. For example, the conventions that define proficient writing in an education major and biology major differ; however, the foundational writing skills developed in general education are fundamental to the many different genres of writing found in particular majors.

As such, OTM elective courses will serve as "pathway" courses directly connected to advanced study in a major. The combination of specifically required or recommended OTM courses, elective major pathway courses, and pre-major/beginning major courses constitute the Transfer Assurance Guide (TAG) for an academic major. A TAG serves as a discipline-specific advising tool to assist students and academic advisors who help them, to make course selections that will ensure the applicability of guaranteed pathways across all public institutions of higher education.

Some OTM courses are approved for specific Transfer Assurance Guide courses. A course approved by a TAG faculty review panel does not mean the course is automatically approved for the OTM. TAG and OTM use different statewide criteria for different applicability purposes. Therefore, institutions wishing to use an OTM course as a TAG course, or vice versa, must submit and have each course reviewed by appropriate statewide faculty review panels.

 

Common Learning Outcomes for All Courses

The fundamental criterion for considering a course for inclusion in the Ohio Transfer Module is that the course directly emphasizes at least one of the learning outcomes for the OTM, as described below. Each public institution should maintain an inventory of courses in its OTM that includes a thorough course description, course learning outcomes, and assessment methods linked to each learning outcome. Individual course syllabi should communicate these same learning outcomes and assessments to students.

The aggregate courses in the OTM emphasize breadth of knowledge in lower-division coursework that serves as an academic foundation for a liberal education; the learning outcomes for individual courses emphasize foundational skills and abilities (the following five bullets). The idea of "skills and abilities" is to be broadly construed and not represent an exhaustive list. For instance, "creativity" is undoubtedly a valued outcome related to communication, reasoning, inquiry, and so on, but "creativity" is not singled out as a separate outcome. So too, courses in the OTM will all help develop students' ability to find and evaluate information, a skill of particular importance in light of technology-based data resources and communication. Neither are the skills and abilities named here intended to focus exclusively on "academic" outcomes; some, like understanding cultural diversity and engaging in a democratic society, are intended to develop particular attitudes, beliefs, motivation, and behavior.

Upon completion of the Ohio Transfer Module, students will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively – all general education programs include a component for writing; many also include a component for oral communication or presentation.
  • Evaluate arguments in a logical fashion – competence in analysis and logical argument are explicit learning goals for most general education programs, although these skills are known by a variety of names (e.g., critical thinking, analysis, logical thinking, etc.).
  • Employ the methods of inquiry characteristic of natural sciences, social sciences, and the arts and humanities – the tools for solving problems vary across disciplines; general education introduces students to methods of inquiry in several fields of study and thereby prepares students to integrate information from different disciplines.
  • Acquire an understanding of our global and diverse culture and society – many general education programs include a component that introduces students to traditions different from their own and gives them opportunities to work productively with diverse peoples, cultures, and histories.
  • Engage in our democratic society – one of the overarching goals of general education is to prepare students to be active and informed citizens; the development of a disposition to participate in and contribute to our democracy is of equal importance to the goal of having the skills to do so intelligently.

Each course in the OTM explicitly connects statements of learning outcomes to assessments of student learning. Not only does the assessment of competency in the various learning outcomes provide a bridge between general education and the major area of study, it also provides the foundation for competency-based transfer. One common approach to competency-based transfer is through the development of rubrics.

Taken together, not only do the breadth of knowledge and the learning outcomes listed above prepare students for advanced study in a major or specialized field, but they also equip them with the tools and habits for continued learning throughout life.

 

Learning Outcomes Specific to English Composition and Certain Mathematics/Statistics Ohio Transfer Module (OTM) Courses

Based on the similar concepts to develop the broad knowledge and foundational skills and abilities among citizens of Ohio, some of the Ohio Transfer Module (OTM) courses are aligned with specific course learning outcomes. The validation of courses through learning outcomes helps ensure the quality education and sound student competency in specific course areas; thus, students will be able to transfer their knowledge and skills that were expected consistently across Ohio public institutions of higher education and advance to a subsequent course without unnecessary duplication or institutional barriers. The first course learning outcomes for the OTM that were created by teams of faculty content experts and implemented in 2009 and 2010 include First Writing, Second Writing, College Algebra, Pre-Calculus, Trigonometry, Calculus I, Calculus II, Introductory Statistics, and Business Calculus. Additional OTM courses with learning outcomes will be developed with the support from and in collaboration with the public institutions of higher education.

 

First Writing and Second Writing: The major learning emphasis includes the teaching, practice, and evaluation of expository writing and argumentative writing, although the course(s) may include other components. These writing activities must be reflected in statements of course learning outcomes and evaluation. Transfer students who have completed the Ohio Transfer Module (OTM) will not be subjected to a diagnostic placement test at the receiving institution unless one is also required of native students who have completed equivalent coursework.

In order to be considered for First Writing and Second Writing OTM courses, each institutional course must meet all of the established learning outcomes. In addition, each set of learning outcomes has recommended credit hours, so that institutions will be able to design, match, and submit courses with a comparable and appropriate amount of credit to fulfill the learning outcomes. 

Use of the OTM Guidelines for English Composition was discontinued starting Fall 2012. All English Composition OTM courses approved under the guidelines were expired by Summer 2012 and replaced by First or Second Writing only when the course received an approval for either First or Second Writing.

 

Mathematics, Statistics, and Logic: The major learning emphasis includes the teaching, practice, and evaluation of foundational mathematics, statistics, and logic courses, although the course(s) may include other components. These learning activities must be reflected in statements of course learning outcomes and evaluation. Transfer students who have completed the Ohio Transfer Module (OTM) will not be subjected to a diagnostic placement test at the receiving institution (unless one is also required of native students who have completed equivalent coursework).

In order to be considered for any of the OTM courses with specific learning outcomes, each institutional course must meet all of the required learning outcomes. In addition, each set of learning outcomes has a typical range of credit hours, so that institutions will be able to design, match, and submit courses that not only serve their unique student skill levels but also provide a general idea of credit based on student learning to fulfill the required learning outcomes.


Guidelines Specific to Each Area   

 

Oral Communication

In addition to the Common Learning Outcomes, the courses in the Oral Communication category are subject to the following guidelines and restrictions:

  1. Courses in oral communication are an option for elective courses within the Ohio Transfer Module (OTM). If a student completes a course in oral communication but does not complete the entire OTM, the course may only apply as an elective upon transfer because not all institutions have this requirement.
  2. The major emphasis of the course must be extemporaneous public speaking (individual/group work) as reflected in statements of course learning outcomes and evaluation. The course(s) may include group presentations and argumentation. Typically, hybrid courses in oral communication include examination of communication theory, but should concentrate on evaluated oral presentations as the primary focus of the course.
  3. Courses that include communication principles leading up to the study or understanding of the oral communication process in other forms (e.g., interviewing, interpersonal, dyads, listening) are not precluded if they meet the criterion for emphasis on extemporaneous speaking.
  4. Courses in oral communication are in addition to First and/or Second Writing and may not replace or substitute for composition courses.

Excluded courses: Courses in which the main focus is theory, the study of communication styles, or oral interpretation and performance (i.e., students should research and prepare their own oral presentations, not give a recitation of existing work).

 

Mathematics, Statistics, and Logic

In addition to the Common Learning Outcomes described above and Ohio Transfer Module (OTM) courses with specific learning outcomes, the courses in the Mathematics, Statistics, and Logic category are subject to the following guidelines and restrictions:

  1. A credit-bearing, college-level course in Mathematics must use the standards required for high school graduation by the State of Ohio as a basis and must do at least one of the following: 1) broaden, or 2) deepen, or 3) extend the student’s learning. 
  2. The course does not cover variable learning outcomes from term to term.
  3. The course is not an upper-division course.
  4. The course is in the areas of mathematics, or statistics, or logic.

 

Arts and Humanities

In addition to the Common Learning Outcomes, the courses in the Arts and Humanities category are subject to the following guidelines and restrictions:

  1. Courses must be introductory-level courses that focus on the study of human endeavors spanning historical periods, regions, and cultures. Courses may be selected from the following disciplines: art, music, theatre, film, literature, religion, philosophy, ethics, and history. Students must select courses from at least two of the disciplines listed.
  2. Skills-based activities, whether graded or not, may be a part of courses in the Ohio Transfer Module (OTM), provided that the courses meet the fundamental criteria (that emphasize at least one of the learning outcomes for the OTM and assume entry-level college proficiencies).
  3. To be acceptable, foreign language courses must devote a majority of the course content to literature and not be grammar and/or skills based.
  4. Articulation of how students interact with primary sources, which may include, but not limited to, works of art, music, film, dance, literature, or philosophy, must be clear in order to demonstrate that students will be performing one or more of the OTM Common Learning Outcomes, including the methods of inquiry typical of the arts and humanities disciplines.

Excluded courses: Remedial or developmental courses, special topics courses, upper-division courses, and narrowly focused technical or pre-technical courses. Also excluded are courses that are primarily designed for skill development (e.g., applied music lessons, studio art, symbolic or formal logic, theatre skills, foreign language, and creative writing).

 

Social and Behavioral Sciences

In addition to the Common Learning Outcomes described above, the courses in the Social and Behavioral Sciences category are subject to the following guidelines and restrictions:

Courses must be introductory-level courses that explain the behavior of individuals and/or various groups in societies, economies, governments, and subcultures through empirical investigation and theoretical interpretation. Courses may be selected from the social and behavioral science disciplines, including anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. Students must select courses from at least two of the disciplines listed.

Excluded courses: Remedial or developmental courses, special topics courses, upper-division courses, and narrowly focused technical or pre-technical skill-based courses. Also excluded are career preparation courses, non-credit continuing education courses, and life experience courses (unless life experience credit, such as military training or other prior learning experience, becomes approved in the future for an OTM credit by the statewide faculty review panel).

 

Natural Sciences

In addition to the Common Learning Outcomes, courses in the Natural Sciences category are subject to the following guidelines and restrictions:

  1. Courses of an introductory nature must make clear the importance of experimental inquiry in the sciences and the way in which such inquiry into the natural world leads scientists to formulate principles that provide universal explanations of diverse phenomena. These courses should have, as a goal, the development of an understanding of how scientific principles are built and used in the modern world and of the impact of science on society. Through these courses, students should develop an understanding of structured thinking involving induction and deduction. Courses may be selected from natural science disciplines such as astronomy, biology, chemistry, environmental science, geology, physical geography, and physics.
  2. In order for students to be able to complete the entire Ohio Transfer Module (OTM) at an institution, they must complete at least one natural science course that is designated and approved by the statewide review panel as a lab course. Lecture-only natural science courses may be submitted by the institution and reviewed and approved by the statewide faculty review panel. If a course contains a lab component, the following must be demonstrated:
  • The laboratory component of courses must carry at least one credit hour and must meet an average of no less than two hours per week.
  • All course descriptions must include a breakdown of lecture and laboratory hours per course.
  • For each credit hour dedicated to the laboratory component of the course, students are expected to spend at least two hours each week throughout essentially the entire semester/quarter on in-lab experimental activities, regardless of the instructional delivery or method.
  • The laboratory component of OTM Natural Sciences courses must include manipulation, observation and/or measurement of actual physical materials and phenomena, data collection and analysis as relevant to the subject.

Excluded courses: Remedial or developmental courses, special topics courses, upper-division courses, and narrowly focused technical or pre-technical courses. Also excluded are courses that focus exclusively on content coverage without addressing the learning outcomes for the OTM.

 

Interdisciplinary Studies

In addition to the Common Learning Outcomes, the courses in the Interdisciplinary Studies category are subject to the following guidelines and restrictions:

  1. Courses with content or methodology drawn explicitly from more than one of the following are defined as “Interdisciplinary”: Natural Sciences; Social Sciences; Arts and Humanities; English Composition (First and Second Writing); Oral Communication; and Mathematics, Statistics, and Logic.
  2. The fundamental criteria for inclusion of Interdisciplinary Studies courses in an Ohio Transfer Module (OTM) are the general ones that apply to all courses which specifically: A) emphasize at least one of the common learning outcomes of the OTM and B) assume entry-level college proficiencies.
  3. Inasmuch as one of the purposes of general education is to provide a "breadth of knowledge", Interdisciplinary Studies courses directly serve one of the purposes of general education and the OTM. It is possible that an entire OTM could be constructed from Interdisciplinary Studies courses, provided the courses in aggregate did not neglect any one of Natural Sciences; Social and Behavioral Sciences; Arts and Humanities; English Composition (First and Second Writing); or Mathematics, Statistics and Logic. In terms of providing breadth of knowledge, two courses that each span, for instance, the Arts and Humanities and the Social and Behavioral Sciences should be considered equivalent to the combination of one Arts and Humanities course and one Social and Behavioral Sciences course. Consequently, each Interdisciplinary Studies course should specify which areas of knowledge it draws on.  
  4. Interdisciplinary Studies courses must be consulted, reviewed, and approved by the appropriate statewide OTM faculty review panels.
  5. When a course is submitted for approval as an Interdisciplinary Studies course, the proposal must specify which areas (viz., Natural Sciences; Social and Behavioral Sciences; Arts and Humanities; English Composition (First and Second Writing); or Mathematics, Statistics, and Logic) the course includes. Furthermore, the proposal must apportion the credit hours of the course to each of the areas. Such apportionment could involve divisions as small as one-half-credit hour. For instance, if a 3-hour course in environmental studies is roughly half Natural Sciences and half Social and Behavioral Sciences, then 1.5 hours of the course will be attributed to Natural Sciences and 1.5 hours to Social and Behavioral Sciences.

[1] Guidelines & Procedures for Academic Program Review, Ohio Department of Higher Education, page 54. https://www.ohiohighered.org/sites/ohiohighered.org/files/Academic-Program-Review-Guidelines_FINAL_042915.pdf   

[2] The Essential Learning Outcomes from the Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP) initiative: http://www.aacu.org/leap/vision.cfm

Appendix J: Articulation and Transfer Institutional Information Guide - Q and A Policy Clarification Statements

Contents/Completion of the Ohio Transfer Module (OTM)

  1. When did the certification of Ohio Transfer Module (OTM) completion begin, and for which students?
    • Students entering institutions that had approved OTM's in the Fall 1991 were the first students for whom certification was required. Sending institutions that were able to certify other students who had entered their colleges earlier also were strongly encouraged to do so.
  2. Does completion of an Associate of Arts (AA)/Associate of Science (AS) degree ensure completion of the OTM?
    • Yes, it does. Students who have an earned AA/AS degree with an overall GPA of 2.0 or better will receive transfer credit for all college-level courses which they have passed, (A, B, C or D).
  3. What is the minimum grade acceptable for completion of the OTM?
    • Students with an earned AA/AS degree from an Ohio public institution of higher education, an overall GPA of 2.0 or better, and a passing grade (A, B, C, or D) in each course included in the OTM will have met the requirements of the OTM of the receiving institution.
    • Students without an AA/AS degree who have completed the OTM with grades of D or better in each course in or after the Fall 2005 (as certified by the sending institution) will be considered to have met the OTM requirements of the receiving institution.
    • Students without an AA/AS degree who have completed the OTM with grades of C or better in each course prior to the Fall 2005 (as certified by the sending institution) will be considered to have met the OTM requirements of the receiving institution.
  4. Can transfer credit be used to satisfy OTM requirements?
    • Yes, it can. The certifying institution should allow all accepted credit from regionally accredited institutions to be used to satisfy OTM requirements.
  5. Can non-traditional credit be used to satisfy OTM requirements?
    • Yes, it can. If the certifying institution grants non-traditional credit, or if it accepts it for transfer students, and if its equivalent is found in the OTM, then it may be used to satisfy OTM requirements.       
  6. If external or non-traditional credit is used to satisfy the OTM, is it necessary that this be communicated to receiving institutions?
    • No, it isn’t.
  7. If external or non-traditional credit is included in the OTM and the receiving institution's policy for "native" students precludes acceptance of such credit, must the receiving institution accept the credit for incoming transfer students?
    • Yes, it must.
  8. The Ohio Articulation and Transfer Policy requires that all college-level courses successfully completed at regionally accredited institutions be accepted and awarded transfer credit. Does the sending or receiving institution determine which courses are college-level?
    • The receiving institution must make this determination on the basis of three guiding standards:
      • The course is not remedial or developmental,
      • The course carries one or more credit hours, and
      • The course hours are eligible to count toward graduation at the sending and receiving institutions.
  9. Can courses for which "forgiveness" has been applied be included in the OTM, and how would this affect GPA?
    • Yes, they can. The policies of the sending institution will determine the "forgiveness" policy in effect and the computation of the GPA.
  10. Assume that the receiving institution requires native students to obtain a grade of C or better in selected courses in the major field or field of concentration. In such cases, is the receiving institution required to utilize courses toward the major field or field of concentration in which grades of D were obtained?
    • No, it isn’t. The transfer student may be treated in like manner to the native student. As always, the receiving institution may be more lenient and utilize courses with grades of D toward such requirements, but this is not required by the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Policy. Although the courses graded D may, in this case, not be applicable to the major field or field of concentration requirements, they must be transferred and awarded credit, at least, as free electives. Furthermore, if the courses were part of the sending institution's OTM, credit must be given as part of the receiving institution's OTM.
  11. How does an institution change its OTM?
    • An institution should consult with the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network (OATN) prior to submitting changes, so that appropriate next steps can be planned and determined together with the OATN.
  12. What happens to a student's OTM requirements when the institution's OTM changes?
    • Each institution's policy regarding the "catalog year" principle for degree requirement changes will also apply to OTM requirement changes. Generally, changes will be applicable to new students entering the institution after the changes have been published, but students enrolled prior to that time will follow an earlier OTM version.
  13. Is there a time limit regarding how recently an OTM and its courses must be completed to transfer?
    • None has been specified. Most institutions have their own requirements regarding the time limit for the use of credits in fulfillment of degree requirements, and it is expected that the same requirements will apply to the completion of the OTM.

 

Transcript Notation

  1. Should a detailed list of all courses accepted be presented on the official transcript, or may a summary be used?
    • The Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network Oversight Board strongly recommends that the receiving institution post all courses accepted in transfer to the Student Academic Record and list them on the transcript and/or the Statement of Transfer and Articulated Credit Applicability (Degree Audit Report) to demonstrate that the receiving institution is accepting all transfer and articulated credit work satisfactorily completed at previous institutions according to the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Policy.
    • There may be some institutions where a summarization of the accepted credit on the transcript is preferable to a complete listing.
  2. What is the recommended timing and placement of the OTM completion notation on the official transcript?
    • Effective with the completion of the Fall 1991 term, students who have completed the institution's approved OTM should have the completion notation on their transcripts.
    • Since the notation is meaningful only to other Ohio colleges and universities with an approved OTM, the minimum requirement is to place a notation on those transcripts which are directed to other participating schools. However, institutions are strongly encouraged to place the completion notations on all transcripts produced for students who have completed the OTM because the sending institutions and the students do not always know the ultimate use of transcripts produced.
    • The "key" or "explanation" of transcript entries, usually found on the reverse side of the paper transcript or in a separate document, must explain the OTM notation.
    • The OTM certifying institution should print the OTM notation "OHIO TRANSFER MODULE COMPLETED (month, year)" in an appropriate place on the paper transcript, record such notation in a designated, agreed-upon attribute for the electronic transcript, and/or display the notation on the Statement of Transfer and Articulated Credit Applicability (Degree Audit Report). It is recommended that it appear either in chronological order or in a specifically designated location on the document(s).
    • For a student who completed the OTM at another institution, the receiving institution should print or record the OTM notation "OHIO TRANSFER MODULE COMPLETED, XYZ COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY (month, year)." The placement on the transcript should be with the posting of the acceptance of credit; the placement on the Statement of Transfer and Articulated Credit Applicability (Degree Audit Report) should be locally determined.

 

Institutional Admissions and Related Questions

  1. What does "Preferential Consideration for Admissions" to an institution mean?
    • Preferential consideration for admissions means giving admissions priority to selected transfer students over other transfer students with all other factors being equal (e.g., grade-point average, credit hours accepted, other institutional criteria).
  2. What will be the effect of this Policy on students who meet institutional admission requirements but not program requirements?
    • Admission to the institution is a separate decision from admission to a major or degree program. Transfer students are treated equitably with native students for admission to major and degree programs.
  3. May the receiving institution recalculate the GPA for admission purposes?
    • While no recalculation can be done for admission to the institution, recalculation can be done for admission to specific programs or majors as long as the process treats transfer and native students equitably.
  4. Does the receiving institution have the responsibility to notify students, in writing, of the acceptance and application of transferred and articulated credits?
    • Yes, it does. However, the organizational units which have this responsibility will vary from institution to institution.
  5. Does admission to the institution guarantee admission into the major or minor?
    • No, it doesn’t. This decision is a separate consideration and the same requirements that apply to native students also apply to transfer students.
  6. Why can an admission guarantee for a public institution of higher education and preferential consideration for admission be given to applicants when they apply prior to receiving the Associate of Arts (AA)/Associate of Science (AS) degree, the Ohio Transfer Module, or 60 semester/90 quarter hours?
    • Admission decisions are based upon the assumption that requirements will be met by the time of enrollment. If they are not completed, the institution may withdraw the offer of admission.

 

Student Appeals Process

  1. What decisions may be appealed by students? Acceptance of credit? Application of credit?
    • The acceptance of credit is carefully delineated in the Policy and should be uniformly practiced by all public institutions. 
    • The application of credit will vary from institution to institution, and it is specified in the Policy as appealable. The appeals process is initiated at the receiving institution, must be publicized, and consists of multiple levels.  Students have 90 days to file an appeal at the campus level on an institution's decision on course applicability. The 90-day period should begin on the date the Statement of Transfer and Articulated Credit Applicability (Degree Audit Report) is given to the student. Institutions should make this report available to students as soon as possible.
    • Students who are not satisfied with the institutional decision after all campus-based appeals are exhausted may follow established procedures to submit a written complaint to the Ohio Department of Higher Education. This process is outlined at https://www.ohiohighered.org/students/complaints.

 

Communications and Publications

  1. Will there be an institutional designee to receive and distribute information regarding transfer and articulation?
    • Each institution has a primary contact person for matters related to Articulation and Transfer Policy issues.
  2. Is inclusion of the articulation and transfer Catalog Statement in the institution's catalog mandatory?
    • Yes, it is. Inclusion of the catalog statement in the electronic and/or print catalog(s) is mandatory.
  3. Is inclusion of the institution’s Ohio Transfer Module in the catalog mandatory?
    • Yes, it is. It must be included in the electronic and/or print catalog(s).
  4. Will there be a centralized publication of approved Ohio Transfer Module Grids and approved courses?
    • Yes, there will. Ohio Transfer Module Grids for all public institutions of higher education in Ohio will be available on the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network (OATN) website, and approved courses will be available on OATN’s course equivalency reporting system on the Ohio Department of Higher Education website. In addition, each institution will publish its Ohio Transfer Module in its catalog(s).   
  5. Who will decide on Policy definitions and interpretations?
    • The Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network (OATN) Oversight Board and Advisory Council meet periodically and are charged with further defining the Policy through interpretations as required. A mechanism has been established to recommend Policy changes and additions to the Chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education.

 

Automated Systems

  1. Is there transfer credit evaluation software available to assist institutions in evaluating courses completed at other institutions?
    • Some institutions have internally developed programs to translate incoming transfer credit. There are multiple vendors who supply software to support the electronic evaluation of transfer credit.

 

Miscellaneous Questions

  1. What is the minimum grade acceptable for the Associate of Arts (AA)/Associate of Science (AS) degree to transfer?
    • Students who have an earned Associate of Arts (AA)/Associate of Science (AS) degree with an overall GPA of 2.0 or better for all previous college-level courses will receive transfer credit for all college level-courses which they have passed (A, B, C, or D) (See Appendix E, Transfer of Courses with a Passing Grade Policy).
  2. If a student completes the Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree and subsequently completes additional coursework above and beyond the AA or AS degree at the same institution or at another institution, are those subsequent courses acceptable for transfer credit at the D grade level, or must the grade be C or better?
  3. Assume that the receiving institution does not award credit for non-traditional credit (e.g., external and institutional credit-by-examinations, experiential learning, etc.) or has more stringent requirements for awarding such credit than the sending institution. In such cases, is the receiving institution required to accept course credit from the sending institution which has been awarded to the student based on nontraditional credit?
    • Yes, it is. In all cases credit must be awarded by the receiving institution toward a course which is equivalent in content at the receiving institution. Even if there are no equivalent courses at the receiving institution, transfer credit must be awarded. This credit must be entered on the student record and must apply to degree requirements, at least, toward free electives.
  4. Does an institution have the authority to require a student to repeat a course?
    • No, it doesn’t. However, institutions can require students to repeat a course only if there is an institutional policy that applies to transfer and native students alike that authentically places a time limit on the currency of course content (e.g., a technology course that has learning outcomes that often undergo substantial revision to meet employment skills expectations or a health-related course that has a time limit imposed by a regulatory or accrediting agency such as for state licensure or certification).

Appendix K: Guiding Principles for the Development of the Transfer Assurance Guides (TAGs)

Ohio’s Articulation and Transfer Policy (1990) was a major achievement in improving the mobility of students among public colleges and universities within the state. Policy revisions recommended by the Articulation and Transfer Advisory Council (2004), together with the mandates from the Ohio General Assembly in Ohio Revised Code 3333.16, extended the impact of the existing policy through more precise advising and the assurance of credit transfer and the application of credits to academic degree/program requirements. A central feature of the enhanced Policy is the development of Transfer Assurance Guides (TAGs). TAGs were initially developed to assist students in more than 38 different degree pathways and were guided by the following principles:

  1. The initiative builds upon the original Articulation and Transfer Policy adopted by the Ohio Department of Higher Education in 1990. The Ohio Transfer Module continues to be the foundation of this work and provides students the opportunity to transfer courses as a block or on an individual course basis.
  2. The purpose of the TAG is to allow students to transfer, in a simple and direct manner, a core of courses that will count toward the major program.
  3. The recommendations of the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Advisory Council and the stipulations of the Ohio Revised Code 3333.16 enhanced the Policy through the creation of Transfer Assurance Guides (TAGs) that provide more precise student advising and guarantee the application of credits within the TAG to the major. TAGs are groups of foundational courses that represent a commonly accepted pathway to majors within the Bachelor’s degree. Courses or course sequences identified as being a part of the TAG may be offered at any public higher education institution in Ohio.
  4. The goal of a TAG is to recognize comparable, compatible and equivalent courses at or above the 70% standard of equivalency adopted by the Articulation and Transfer Advisory Council.[1] TAGs apply across, at least, all public higher education institutions in Ohio and embody commonly accepted pathways to majors within the Bachelor’s degree. This does not alter the mission or degree authority of any institution; it does provide guaranteed pathways that enable students to reach their bachelor’s degree goals in the most efficient manner.
  5. The TAGs are composed of courses and learning outcomes. Consensus on courses commonly included in particular Bachelor’s degree discipline pathways is based on the evaluation of the content and performance expectations on a course-by-course basis within each TAG. When consensus is established, students are assured not only of the equivalency of the courses, but of their application to the degree objective.
  6. Transfer students and students who begin and end study at the same institution will be treated equitably with regard to institutional or major/program admissions requirements. All students will be held accountable to the same admissions and graduation expectations such as grade-point average requirements, residency requirements, and performance requirements/ portfolio requirements specific to certain majors.
  7. The role of faculty in the development of the TAGs is paramount, and colleges and universities will continue to have ample opportunity to review and comment on the work of the panels.
  8. All campuses are expected to comply with the revised Ohio Articulation and Transfer Policy and guarantee the transfer of courses in the TAG for application to degree/program requirements. Campuses may have specific curricular issues in the implementation of TAGs for certain disciplinary fields. An appeals process for institutions focuses on such substantive curricular/programmatic issues as TAGs are implemented. The Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network (OATN) Oversight Board will handle the appeals process and is the final arbiter of appeals, using the faculty subcommittee of the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network Advisory Council as appropriate. The OATN Oversight Board will report to the OATN Advisory Council. 

The Articulation and Transfer Policy was significantly enhanced by the development of the Transfer Assurance Guides. The above principles were developed to provide a context for understanding the enhancements to the Policy and to elucidate the TAGs. The principles are a result of the leadership of the Articulation and Transfer Advisory Council and continued support by the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network Oversight Board and Advisory Council, representative committees drawn from various segments of the higher education community.

 

Policy approved by the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Advisory Council - February 17, 2005.

Update endorsed by the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network Oversight Board – December 2015.


[1] The Articulation and Transfer Council’s charge and structure was different in 2004 than it is currently.

Appendix L: Guiding Principles for the Development of Career-Technical Assurance Guides (CTAGs) Through the Career-Technical Credit Transfer (CT)² Initiative

The following principles will guide the successful implementation of the project.

  1. Where applicable, the policies and procedures developed build upon the creation of a comprehensive course equivalency classification system required by section 3333.16 of the Ohio Revised Code.
  2. The initiative builds upon the "lessons learned" from previous articulation and transfer alignment work.
  3. The development of a Career-Technical Assurance Guide (CTAG) requires a system that enables commonly agreed-upon course or program, based on recognized industry standards, and successfully completed course/program by either adult or secondary career-technical students to be transferable and applicable at any public institution of higher education. This initiative does not alter the mission of participating schools and does not imply the evolution of adult career-technical institutions into associate or baccalaureate degree offering entities.
  4. The overall goal of this initiative is to allow identified technical courses/content to transfer "without unnecessary duplication or institutional barriers."
  5. This initiative is being implemented through the collaborative work by the Ohio Department of Higher Education, the Ohio Department of Education, and other key stakeholders.
  6. Consensus decision-making will guide the initiative work to effect a change in Ohio's educational system by providing a guarantee that enables learners to reach their educational goals in the most efficient manner. However, the primary foci and missions of career-technical institutions or comprehensive high schools and the public institutions of higher education will remain unaltered.
  7. Continuous communication about the progress of this initiative is important and will be ensured through a variety of media. A website was developed to disseminate information relevant to the work of the committees.
  8. The initial work was completed in a timely manner to support delivery of a progress report to the General Assembly by April 15, 2006 and the implementation of the initiative by April 15, 2007.

The above Articulation and Transfer principles provide a context for understanding the enhancements to the Policy and provide a clearer P-16 continuum and enhancement of workforce development. The principles are a result of the leadership of the Career-Technical Credit Transfer Advisory Committee of the Articulation and Transfer Advisory Council and continued support by the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network Oversight Board and Advisory Council, representative committees drawn from various segments of the state's educational community.

Appendix M: Directive for the Baseline Set of Standards and Procedures for the Awarding of College Credit for Military Training, Experience, and Coursework

Appendix N: Directive for the Advanced Placement (AP) Policy

Appendix O: Institutional Requirements for Serving Veterans and Active Duty Service Members

Signed into Law: June 16, 2014
Effective Immediately

The board of trustees of each state institution of higher education shall do all of the following by December 31, 2014:

(A) Designate at least one person employed by the institution to serve as the contact person for veterans and service member affairs. Such a person shall assist and advise veterans and service members on issues related to Am. Sub. H. B. No. 488, 130th Ohio General Assembly. The person or persons designated under division (A) of this section shall not be a person currently designated by the institution as a veterans administration certifying official (Ohio Revised Code 3345.421).

(B) Adopt a policy regarding the support and assistance the institution will provide to veterans and service members. The chancellor of higher education will provide guidance to state institutions of higher education in their compliance with this section, including the recommendation of standardized policies on support and assistance to veterans and service members (Ohio Revised Code 3345.421).

(C) Allow for the establishment of a student-led group on campus for student service members and veterans and encourage other service member- and veteran-friendly organizations (Ohio Revised Code 3345.421).

(D) Integrate existing career services to create and encourage meaningful collaborative relationships between student service members and veterans and alumni of the institution, that links student service members and veterans with prospective employers, and that provides student service members and veterans with social opportunities; and, if the institution has career services programs, encourage the responsible office to seek and promote partnership opportunities for internships and employment of student service members and veterans with state, local, national, and international employers (Ohio Revised Code 3345.421).

(E) Survey student service members and veterans to identify their needs and challenges and make the survey available to faculty and staff at the state institution of higher education. And periodically conduct follow-up surveys, at a frequency determined by the board, to gauge the institution's progress toward meeting identified needs and challenges (Ohio Revised Code 3345.421).

(F) Establish an appeals procedure for students who are veterans or service members for resolving disputes regarding the awarding of college credit for military experience (Ohio Revised Code 3345.423). 

State institutions of higher education shall do all of the following by December 31, 2014:

1. Provide a student who is either a veteran or a service member with priority for course registration (Ohio Revised Code 3345.422).  

2. Not charge a student who is a veteran or a service member any fee for the evaluation, transcription, or application of college credit for military training, experience, and coursework (Ohio Revised Code 3345.424).

State institutions of higher education shall do the following by July 1, 2015:

1. Ensure that appropriate equivalent credit is awarded for military training, experience, and coursework that meet the baseline standards and procedures developed by the chancellor pursuant to the Ohio Revised Code 3333.164 (B) (1) (Ohio Revised Code 3333.164 C).

Additional information is available on the Ohio Values Veterans Toolkit, including policy-related frequently asked questions and Ohio Revised Code references: https://www.ohiohighered.org/ohio_values_veterans/toolkit

Appendix P: Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network Communication Flowchart

Click anywhere on the chart to make it larger on your screen.

Appendix P

Appendix Q: Procedures for Amending the Policy on Articulation and Transfer

Introduction 

Based on issues that have emerged relating to the implementation of the 1990 Articulation and Transfer Policy, at its meeting on June 21, 1991, the Articulation and Transfer Council[1] formed a Subcommittee to develop a process whereby the Policy might be amended. The Subcommittee initially met on August 30, 1991, adopting fundamental assumptions, which have been updated and adjusted over time to improve communication and participation:

  1. Written proposals to amend the Policy must emanate from one of the following sources:
    1. Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network (OATN) Oversight Board
    2. Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network (OATN) Advisory Council
    3. Any of the standing committees that were formed by and report to the Advisory Council
    4. The Department of Higher Education/Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network
    5. An individual institution
  2. Proposals to amend the Policy must adhere to a hierarchical structure of evaluation with no individual level having veto authority.
  3. Ultimately, formal amendments to the Policy will be made by the OATN Oversight Board for consideration and action by the Chancellor of the Department of Higher Education.

 

Structure for the Amendment Process

  1. Consideration will be given to written proposals to amend the Policy which emanate from one of the following sources: OATN Oversight Board, OATN Advisory Council, any of the standing subcommittees which report to the Advisory Council, Department of Higher Education/OATN, or an individual institution. A proposal will be "routed" to the appropriate group for consideration.
  2. A hierarchical procedure for evaluation will be followed. From each group that evaluates the issue or proposal, a recommendation, accompanied by a rationale and the outcome of a formal vote, will be referred to the next higher level, regardless of the outcome of the vote, until a final recommendation is made by the OATN Oversight Board. 
  3. Once a proposal reaches the OATN Oversight Board, it may be acted upon directly by the Board in consultation with the Advisory Council and/or another appropriate work group or subcommittee. Previously, proposals were reviewed by a Standing Amendment Subcommittee (which no longer exists) composed of three members of the Articulation and Transfer Council at that time and at least one member of each of the Articulation and Transfer Council's standing subcommittees.  
  4. Within the OATN Oversight Board, a formal vote will be taken (see detailed process below) on all proposals that have been brought to it, and the results will be conveyed to the Chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education for deliberation and final action.

 

Detailed Process

The following process is used to communicate, evaluate, and make decisions regarding Policy amendments: 

  1. Given the need for a full deliberation of issues relating to implementation and the need to have all members of all groups participating in the deliberation, it should be made clear to those who are asked to serve on the OATN Oversight Board and standing committees that attendance at meetings is mandatory. An alternate may be sent to a meeting; however, the alternate will neither:
    1. Be counted as part of the quorum; nor
    2. Have voting privileges.
  2. Within the OATN Oversight Board:
    1. Proposed amendments (from whatever source) must be presented to the Oversight Board with a full rationale and with the result of the formal vote on the proposal from all lower levels in the hierarchical evaluation process. The vote by the Oversight Board will not occur until the meeting following the one where the proposal is presented. In this way, Oversight Board members are given more time to evaluate the proposal personally and to consult with others on their campuses before voting.
    2. Before the Oversight Board may vote on a proposed amendment, there must be a 2/3 quorum in attendance and recorded.
    3. The proposal will be sent to the Chancellor of the Department of Higher Education with the Oversight Board's formal vote on the proposal recorded.

[1] The Articulation and Transfer Council’s charge and structure was different in 1991 than it is currently.

Appendix R: Directive for the Definition of Semester Credit Hour and Length of Semester Term